Planescape via TSoY

from this thread

Planescape is Guy Ritchie, Charles Dickens and China Mieville playing D&D together while gurgling alternating shots of Mountain Dew and absinthe. I want Beholder loan-shark eye-cult lords, Githyanki veterans, sword fights in taverns, magic wand duels, epic artifacts and keys to other planes.

Planescape is about how your PC’s beliefs shape the reality of the planes. When you go through a gate to another plane, I picture it Dogs in the Vineyard-style with alien D&D Monster Manual communities in crisis waiting to be pushed in the direction of your various factions and thus remolding the Planes in your Chaotic or Lawful whatever image.

When you are in Sigil proper it is about street deals and politics.

I am hoping to play this on Sunday as a kind of break from our weekly game. We’ll see if it comes to fruit.

I am also going to use this space later to catagorize the Keys and Secrets so it is easy for players to access them during play…not that Library school has had any effect on me or anything…

EDIT: Revised since Guy Ritchie was mentioned below.

Keys
—–
Keys are the motivations, problems, connections, duties, and loyalties that pull on your character. To the player, they’re highly important because they generate experience points. Creating new Keys may be easier than new Abilities or Secrets – they follow very simple rules.

A Key must involve a motivation, problem, connection, duty, or loyalty.

Keys come in two types:

* Motivations. When the motivation is fulfilled in play, gain an experience point. When the motivation is fulfilled against good odds, gain three experience points.
* Everything else. When the Key comes up in play, gain an experience point. (You can use this three times per session. This applies to all Keys below.) When the Key presents a minor problem, gain two experience points. When it presents a major problem, gain five experience points.

All Keys have a Buyoff, which is a reversal from the Key by the character. All Buyoffs give the character 10 experience points. This Buyoff occurs only when you, the player, want it to happen: you can lose a battle with the Secret of Bloodlust and still keep the Secret. If you want your character to undergo a change in her personality, though, adding to the story, you can take this Buyoff by fulfilling it. If you do take the Buyoff, you can never take this Key again.

As always, see the pre-made Keys to get a feel for creating your own.

Passion Keys


Key of Fraternity
Your character has someone she is sworn to, a friend who is more important than anyone else. Gain 1 XP every time this character is present in a scene with your character (maximum 3 per adventure). Gain 2 XP whenever your character has to make a decision that is influenced by them. Gain 5 XP every time your character defends them by putting herself at risk. Buyoff: Sever the relationship with this person.

Key of Glittering Gold
Your character loves wealth. Gain 1 XP every time you make a deal that favors you in wealth. Gain 3 XP every time you double your wealth.
Buyoff: Give away everything you own except what you can carry lightly.

Key of the Guardian
Your character has a ward, someone who depends on her for security and protection. Gain 1 XP every time this character is present in a scene with your character. Gain 2 XP whenever your character has to make a decision that is influenced by them. Gain 5 XP every time your character rescues them from harm.

Buyoff: Sever the relationship with this person.

Key of the Impostor
Sometimes your entire life is a lie. You gain 1 XP whenever you pass yourself off as someone/something you’re not. You gain 2 XP whenever you convince others in spite of serious skepticism. You gain 5 XP whenever your story survives a deliberate, focused, “Hey everybody, look!” attempt to reveal your identity.
Buyoff: Confess your imposture to those duped.

Key of the Amnesiac
Gain 1 XP each time you meet someone who recognizes you but you don’t recognize. Gain 3 XP every time you find significant details about your past. Gain 5 XP every time your lack of past threatens your very life.
Buy-off: Regain your memory.

Key of the Masochist
Your character thrives on personal pain and suffering. Gain 1 XP every time she is bloodied and 3 XP every time she is broken.
Buyoff: Flee a source of physical or psychic damage.

Key of the Xeno-fetishist
1 xp for showing or expressing affection for a being of another species. 2 xp for publicly declaring or showing that love when it is frowned upon. 5 xp for wooing a powerful being of another species whose disapproval could mean death or worse.

Buy-off: Court a person who is safe, of the same species and traditionally meant for a person of your race, station and such.

Key of the Bastard Seed
1 xp for bragging about your many sexual conquests all over the planes. 2 xp for having sex with someone in a place where you plan to never return. 5 xp for acknowledging a bastard as your own.

Buy-off: Deny that you ever touched one of your far-away conquests or deny that a bastard of your own is of your seed.

Key of the Cobra and the Mongoose
1 xp every time you argue with your lover about philosophy or alignment. 3 xp every time you and your lover end up on different sides of a conflict concerning philosophy or alignment.
Buy-off: Leave lover because you two are just too different.

Key of the Mission
Your character has a personal mission that she must complete. Gain 1 XP every time she takes action to complete this mission (2 XP if this action is successful.) Gain 5 XP every time she takes action that completes a major part of this mission.
Buyoff: Abandon this mission.

Key of the Outcast
Your character has lost fellowship or membership in an organization – which could just be a culture, or a specific cross-cultural group. This separation defines your character as much as membership in the organization defines its members. Gain 1 XP every time her status with this organization comes up. Gain 2 XP every time her disassociation brings her harm. Gain 5 XP every time the separation brings your character great pain and suffering.
Buyoff: Regain membership in the organization.
Key of the Sap
Gain 1 XP every time you get a raw deal. Gain 3 XP for making a deal with a devil or demon. Gain 5 XP every time you agree to something that ends up destroying your life or the life of a companion.
Buy-Off: Get the better of someone.

Key of Renown
“You must be the worst assassin I’ve ever heard of.”

“But you have heard of me.”

You gain 1 XP whenever you see to it that your name and deeds are known, by bragging about them or making sure there are witnesses. You gain 2 XP whenever you put yourself at risk to do something unnecessary or foolish that will add to your reputation. You gain 5 XP whenever you risk your life to take credit for your actions (bragging that you were the one who killed the Duke’s son, for example.).
Buyoff: Give someone else credit for an action that would increase your renown.

Key of Power
You don’t even care what you do with it, you just want it. You gain 1 XP whenever you earn a boon from someone important, earn a slight gain in prestige, or make a rival look bad. You gain 3 XP whenever you ruin, kill, or otherwise eliminate a rival, and improve your own position because of it.
Buyoff: Relinquish your power and position.

Key of Vengeance
Your character has a hatred for a particular organization, person, or even species or culture. Gain 1 XP every time your character hurts a member of that group or a lackey of that person. Gain 2 XP every time your character strikes a minor blow at that group or person (killing a member of the organization or one of the person’s lackeys, disrupting their life, destroying their property). Gain 5 XP every time your character strikes a major blow at that group or person.
Buyoff: Let your enemy go.

Key of the Vow
Your character has a vow of personal behavior that she has sworn not to break. This could be a dietary restriction, a requirement to pray at sunbreak every morning, or something else like that. Gain 1 XP for every adventure in which your character does not break this vow. Gain 2 XP every time your character does not break this vow even though it causes her minor harm or inconvenience. Gain 5 XP every time your character does not break this vow even though it causes her great harm.
Buyoff: Break this vow.
Key of Bloodlust
Your character enjoys overpowering others in combat. Gain 1 XP every time your character defeats someone in battle. Gain 3 XP for defeating someone equal to or more powerful than your character (equal or higher combat skill.) Buyoff: Be defeated in battle.

Key of Conscience
Your character has a soft spot for those weaker than their opponents. Gain 1 XP every time your character helps someone who cannot help themselves. Gain 2 XP every time your character defends someone with might who is in danger and cannot save themselves. Gain 5 XP every time your character takes someone in an unfortunate situation and changes their life to where they can help themselves. Buyoff: Ignore a request for help.

Key of the Coward
Your character avoids combat like the plague. Gain 1 XP every time your character avoids a potentially dangerous situation. Gain 3 XP every time your character stops a combat using other means besides violence. Buyoff: Leap into combat with no hesitation.
Key of the Conspirator
Gain 1 XP each time your hide information from someone who trusts you. Gain 3 XP every time your membership in the conspiracy puts you in danger. Gain 5 XP each time you destroy a friend or ally for the conspiracy’s goals.

Buy-off: Betray the conspiracy.

Key of Faith
Your character has a strong religious belief that guides her. Gain 1 XP every time she defends her faith to others. Gain 2 XP whenever this character converts someone to her faith. Gain 5 XP whenever this character defends her faith even though it brings her great harm. Buyoff: Your character renounces her beliefs.

D&D Trope Keys
Key of Chaotic Evil (Alignment)

1 xp every time you ignore others for your own self-interests. 3 xp every time an action effs over everyone you know in order for you to gain power.

Buy-off: Do something selfless.

Key of Neutral (Alignment)
1 xp every time you do not take a side in a conflict but still stay in the heart and drama of the adventure (no TURTLING!). 2 xp every time you make extremists see a middle road. 5 xp every time you put yourself in the middle of a conflict that is far over your head and help mediate a more neutral conclusion.

Buy-off: Take a side and make a stand!

Key of Lawful Good (Alignment)
1 xp every time you obey the laws even when it is inconvenient. 3 xp every time you enforce the laws even when it means tremendous physical peril.

Buy-off: Disobey the law for a selfish act.

Key of the Blood War Merc
1 xp every time you profit in some way from the never-ending war between the Devils and the Demons. 2 xp every time you spill blood in a battle of the Blood War. 5 xp for every time you are caught in between both devil and demon soldiers.

Buyoff: Go to a Heavenly Power (a Paladin or Priest will do) and humbly beg for forgiveness for ever having served under the banner of Hell or the Abyss.

Thief Key (Class)
1 xp for every time you solve a problem with stealth and cunning. 2 xp for every time you use stealth in the face of battle. 5 xp for every time you hit a powerful foe from the shadows and they never saw you coming.

Buyoff: Take on a problem head on with no stealth or cunning to speak of.

Paladin Key (Class)
1 xp for every time you do battle with injustice. 2 xp for every time you execute a guilty criminal. 5 xp for every time you directly battle a powerful evil with your sword or with the power of mercy.

Buy-out: Put down your holy sword, free your holy steed and renounce your deity.

Cleric Key (Class)
1 xp every time you turn to your deity to solve a problem. 2 xp for every time you heal a comrade and keep them alive. 5 xp for every time you put yourself in mortal danger for your deity.

Buyoff: Renounce your deity and burn your robes.

Fighter Key (Class)
1 xp every time you put yourself in the front of a battle. 2 xp every time you take a wound so that one of your comrades can do something other than melee. 5 xp for battling a foe as or more powerful as yourself.

Buyoff: Solve a problem without the sword.

Key of the Wizard (Class)
Gain 1 XP every time you cast a spell. Gain 3 XP every time you solve a problem using only magic. Gain 5 XP every time you completely exhaust your magic and must rely on your companions to protect you.

Buy-Off: Resolve a major problem without using magic, when magic is available to you as a solution.

Key of the Elemental-born
(Player must choose the character’s chosen element)
1 xp make your chosen element (fire, earth, air or water) a part of the scene. 2 xp exhibit traits of your chosen element. 5 xp, defeat a foe that represents your chosen element’s opposite.

Buy-out: Make peace with your chose element’s opposite and incorporate it into your life.

Key of the Liche-Queen
1 xp whenever you mention the glory and power of your Liche-Queen. 2 xp whenever you wield your silver sword in defense of her honor or holdings. 5 xp whenever you show how you are willing to die for her glory.

Buy-out: Renounce your queen, leave her service and become a hunted rogue among the Githyanki.

Key of the Githyanki
1 xp for cursing the name of an Illithid or Githzarai. 2 xp for taking up arms or taking part in a hunt for such a creature. 5 xp for taking on a greater or equal foe who is an illithid or a Githzarai.

Buy-out: Shelter such a creature, not as a prisoner to be taken to the Liche-Queen but as an equal and a comrade.

Key of the Planar Traveler
Gain 1 XP each time you go to a new plane. Gain 3 XP each time your presence on the plane has a significant effect on the course of its history. Gain 5 XP each time you learn the secret of a gate.

Buy-Off: Remain on the same plane (not sigil) for a year and a day of your own free will.

Sigil & Factions
Key of the Clueless Primer Berk

1 xp for every time ignorance of Sigil’s ways is highlighted in some manner in a scene. 2 xp for every time being a clueless primer gets you into trouble. 5 xp for every time some cutter tries to send you into the deadbook because you were just too damned thick.

Buy-off: You’ve grown up, found your legs under ya and made Sigil work for you by doing something downright cunning.

Key of the Cutter

1 xp for every time your cunning knowledge of the planes did you and yours right. 5 xp for every time you get one over on some big Planar Bad-ass because you were just too in-the-know.

Buy-off: Admit that you are in the scheming and the planning too deep and don’t know what to do.

Key of the Athar (faction)

1 xp for planting the seed of doubt in a believer’s mind. (“If Thornax is so all-powerful and benevolent, why did your wife just die of cholera, berk?”) 3 xp for “un-converting” a believer. 5 xp for convincing a priest that his own god is a fraud.

Buy-off: The fear of hell(s) or lure of heaven(s) (or both) becomes too powerful and you recant your skepticism.

Key of the Blood War Merc
1 xp every time you profit in some way from the never-ending war between the Devils and the Demons. 2 xp every time you spill blood in a battle of the Blood War. 5 xp for every time you are caught in between both devil and demon soldiers.

Buy-out: Go to a Heavenly Power (a Paladin or Priest will do) and humbly beg for forgiveness for ever having served under the banner of Hell or the Abyss.

Key of the Sensate (faction)
Gain 1 XP every time you feel a new sensation. Gain 3 XP when you go to great lengths to feel a new sensation. Gain 5 XP when you cause yourself great injury in pursuit of new sensation.

Buy-Off: Decline an invitation to try something new.

Key of the Deity (faction)
Gain 1 XP each time someone hails you as a god. Gain 3 XP each time your total number of worshippers doubles. Gain 5 XP if you spread your worship throughout a plane, or create a plane from scratch.

Buy-Off: Renounce your divinity and take up a mortal life.

Secrets
——–
Secrets are special qualities your character has that let her do extraordinary things. They generally work in the following ways:

* Permanently get a bonus die to a specific use of an ability.
* Permanently get +1 damage or protection with an ability.
* Permanently get a minor unusual ability. This ability may require a skill use.
* Spend one die from a pool to use an ability in an unusual way.
* Spend two or three dice from a pool to use an ability in a supernatural or powerful unusual way.
* Spend as many dice from a pool for a scalable effect. If this effect is especially powerful or unusual, it may carry a cost of extra dice.

Secret of Animal Speech
Your character can speak to an animal and understand its signals. In order to get the animal to cooperate or not try to eat you, you might need a successful Animal Ken ability check. Even if you fail this check, you’ll understand that it wants to eat you loud and clear. Cost: 2 Instinct.

Secret of Blessing
With a successful Pray ability check, your character may bless the actions of a group. You must state a specific goal for them to accomplish. Your success level with this ability check is a pool of bonus dice any member of this group can use in accomplishing this task. Cost: 1 Vigor.

Secret of the Bodhisavatta
You must have at least one ability ranked at Grand Master to take this Secret. When you roll a Transcendent success level, you do not have to have your character transcend. Your character can deny herself of perfection and will stay chained to this life. Roll a penalty die immediately. You can keep rolling penalty dice until you are no longer Transcendent. Cost: Take a level one harm associated with the ability per penalty die.

Secret of Contacts
Your character knows all sorts of people in all sorts of places. You can use this Secret for your character to automatically have a past relationship with any Story Guide character in the adventure. You may describe the relationship in a short phrase, such as “old enemy,” “wartime buddy,” “ex-lover,” but the Story Guide gets to decide the history and current disposition of the relationship. Cost: 3 points from a pool determined by the Story Guide. Vigor would fit for a wartime buddy, Instinct for an ex-lover, and Reason for a former colleague in your character’s field of study.

Secret of Disarm
Your character can disarm an opponent, without changing intentions, with a successful ability check using a weapon in Bringing Down the Pain. Because weapons can be all sorts of things in this game, “disarm” just means that the weapon’s been rendered ineffective for the duration of Bringing Down the Pain. Cost: 1 Vigor.

Secret of Enhancement (Ability)
You must select an ability when you take this Secret. You may spend as many points out of the associated pool to give bonus dice to the ability as you like.

Secret of Evaluate
Your character’s battle experience has given her the ability to read an opponent well. Evaluate your character’s opponent not in descriptive terms, but in game mechanics, on a successful Battle ability check. You can ask for any of the following information, one bit per success level: Vigor score, Instinct score, best combat ability and score, specific ability score. Cost: 1 Reason.

Secret of Flying Leap
Your character can make amazing leaps. Using this Secret, she can jump much further or higher than normal. For each Vigor point you spend, up to three, you can jump another multiple of normal human ability for one leap.

Secret of Herbal Health
Your character can always find an herb that is an effective healing agent with a successful Woodscraft ability check in the outdoors. The herb lets you use your Woodscraft Ability to act like First Aid and heal others. Cost: 1 Reason.

Secret of the Hidden Pocket
Your character is adept at hiding objects on her person. No matter how carefully searched the character has been, she may pull an inexpensive, small (hand-sized) item off her person with a successful Stealth ability check. Cost: 2 Instinct.

Secret of Imbuement
Turn an item into a weapon or armor, using the rules found in the Resolution chapter. You can add one weapon or armor rating to the item each time you take this Secret. In addition, you can use this Secret to imbue the item with the power of another Secret. That Secret will have its costs lowered by one pool point. The item can be taken away from you, but you must be given a chance to get it back, or you can roll your advances spent on this Secret into a new item. You can take away someone else’s Imbued item, but you’ll have to pay the original cost to keep it.

Secret of Inner Meaning
Your character’s art carries a meaning beyond the surface. Use any non-physical Instinct-based ability at a distance via a piece of your character’s art. Cost: 2 Reason.

Secret of Knock-back
Your character’s blows send people flying. Knock back a stricken character one yard per success level. This immediately ends Bringing Down the Pain if you’re involved in that, with no resolution as to intentions. Cost: 2 Vigor.

Secret of Languages (Specific language)
Your character knows a language outside her homeland’s.

Secret of Mighty Blow
Your character can strike with extreme might. Spend as many dice of Vigor as you like to increase the harm of a successful blow in combat.

Secret of Quality Construction (Craft Ability)
You must choose a specific Craft Ability when you take this Secret. Your character can craft items of excellent quality. Any item your character creates using this Secret gives one bonus die to a particular ability when using the item, permanently. Cost: 5 Reason.

Secret of Scribing
Your character can read and write any language she knows.

Secret of Shattering
The weight of your weapon can be used to destroy other weapons and armor in combat. With a successful attack, your success level (not including any damage bonuses) is removed from the damage bonuses of weapons or damage reductions of armor. If reduced to 0, the item is destroyed. Cost: 2 Vigor. (Note: if used against player characters’ weapons or armor bought with the Secret of Imbuement, they may repair the item or have it become something new after the scene.)

Secret of the Signature Weapon
Your character has one weapon with which she is bonded. You gain a bonus die to any action taken with that weapon and any other character else attempting to use the weapon receives a penalty die. (Note: to change this weapon, this Secret must be taken again.)

Secret of Specialty (Skill)
You must select an ability when you take this Secret. Choose a specialty your character has within that ability – for example, cooking pastries for the Complex Crafts skill. You always have a bonus die when your character attempts an action that falls within that specialty.

Secret of Synergy
You can chain multiple abilities together in Bringing Down the Pain as you would in a normal ability check; that is, you can roll multiple ability checks in one action to add bonus dice to the final check. Cost: 1 associated pool point for each extra ability you roll.

Secret of the Sudden Knife
Your character is a master of the assassin’s art. In a surprise attack, the victim automatically takes harm level 4 (bloodied) if your character successfully hits. She should make an Endure ability check resisting your roll. If she fails, she automatically takes harm level 6. This is irrespective of being in a Bringing Down the Pain situation. Cost: 3 points from whatever pool is associated with the ability you’re using, plus 1 from each other the other pools.

Secret of Throwing
Anything is a dangerous missile in your character’s hands. She can throw anything fist-sized to great sword-sized as an attack, using the Aim ability, and the object counts as a +1 weapon. Cost: 1 Vigor.

Secret of the Unwalked Path
Your character’s footfalls leave little trace for others to follow. You can use your character’s Woodcraft ability in resistance to anyone trying to track her. Cost: 1 Instinct.

Secret of the Gate

The character knows how to activate a planar gate. The player may create the gate and its destination or gain the knowledge of an existing gate mentioned already in the game. If the gate’s destination was mentioned in game already, that information should stand unless it is more interesting that the NPC/GMC was unreliable.

Secret of the Elemental Planes

The character can manipulate an element with ease, bending it to their will with an appropriate role. They cannot manipulate anymore elemental stuff than they have body-weight.

(There should be costs attributed to both of these but I’m on a break at work and don’t have my book with me. More on this later.)

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20 thoughts on “Planescape via TSoY

  1. Hey dude, really curious as to how you handle the Outer Planes stuff. With humanoid colonies in the various planes, you can totally use TSOY to its full effect. Only problem is that with non-friendly (that is, the typical D&D “Kill all humans on sight”) monsters is that you really can’t get a lot of the depth of Bringing Down the Pain. It’s the point that actually derailed my campaign a little before I readjusted when we moved to Revised.

    Hope that helps-
    Andy

    • I’m definitely thinking about Planar travel in line with Dogs in the Vineyard (and its mother, Trollbabe). The players I game with know DitV too, so they’ll know that when they go through a planar gate, they will be agents of…not quite judgement, but certainly avatars of their philosophies who will effect a town in crisis.

  2. Funny, that’s pretty close to how I’ve seen it- Sigil is D&D meets Guy Ritchie- Outer Planes is random “people”(entities, whatever) having problems and the group walking right into it.

    Worthwhile thing to highlight- the difference between the normal denizens of a given area vs. those interested in the Plane Wars…

    “Well, us Efreet were having a mighty fine time, especially since the Cult of Flamegazers took hold on the Prime- they’d send us offerings, we’d give them fire magic, wisdom, cast an Everburning Torch here and there, and sure enough, business was good. Then one of ours from halfway cross the plane gets in his fool head he wants to take all the Elemental Planes, starts getting an army, and before you know it- the magic on the whole plane has gotten scarce, the Flamegazers aren’t getting their magic, we’re not getting our offerings, and the whole thing has gotten sketchy.”

  3. What is TSoY?

    Also, that Masochist Key, focuses a lot on physical damage (or bodily harm), and I therefore assume that the game is probably pretty physical (which could be wrong) but couldn’t someone who was a masochist (and therefore would likely pick up this key) inflict emotional pain on themselves as well, and could they gain experience from that? what if they created dramatic and painful scenarios only to torture themselves:

    A secret masochist is engaged to a beautiful woman whom he loves, he cheats on her, rather blatantly, and causes her to leave him because he feels he deserves it.

    Or, another quick example, in a horrible fight with a friend, this character realizes that they are wrong and is presented with an oppotunity to apologize. She doesn’t, however, because she feels that if she did apologize she would be getting off too lightly, she, instead, deserves the pain of having harmed a freindship.

    Or, another one … This person often acts in predictable and socially unacceptable ways in order to incite others to insult him constantly. He knows what he does is wrong or annoying, but he gets pleasure when people say nasty things about him out of anger or frustration.

    Then the buyoff could also relate to relieving these emotional issues by apologizing and working through problems to create positive relationships.

    I suppose this interpretation would make for a pretty twisted character which *could* be taken too far, but it could also add versatility to the Key and drama in the grp’s social relationships. Of course, now I want to make a masochist character.

  4. I have always loved Planescape and have been really excited with what you’re doing with it.

    I’d definitely like to try TSoY Planescape at some point as either a GM or a player.

    Lately, Bob and I have been discussing Burning Wheel Shadowrun. Hmm…

  5. I’ve stopped being a fan of pre-developed gaming worlds. Maybe it’s pride, maybe it’s lazy, maybe it’s because they don’t ever match what I want in a world.

    What does pride have to do with it? Am I too proud to use someone else’s work or look down on those who do? Not at all. I a hate running games in settings where the players could know more about what’s going on than I do. If I were ever to touch a published D&D setting that would pretty much be guaranteed. Of course that is exacerbated by my laziness; learning someone else’s material is tougher than making up your own.

    Most importantly I like the idea of tailoring fragments of the world to the story I am telling now. Bending things to fit the needs of where I am at this point, instead of bending my activities to what some writer was thinking at some time in the past. Michael Moorcock once said something similar about why he had never made a Map of the Young Kingdoms. I don’t agree with everything he was saying – I love the idea of mapping out where my campaigns have gone, but I don’t like having the map completely filled in before I start.

    I’m going to post this in my LJ as well.

    • I absolutely never use metaplot and when we use any kind of a published world, my friends and I know that the only gospel is what we decide at the table.

      Most of the time I use worlds that we build through play but Planescape is an old favorite of mine from childhood.

          • Many of Michael Moorcock’s books are set in the Multiverse/Million Spheres. I originally knew it from the Elric series where it was just the Million Spheres. I think the Multiverse might be larger than the Million Spheres, just like it’s larger than the limited 7 worlds in the original Corum books. But I could be mistaken.

            Why do I like it for gaming?

            It’s thematically heavy-handed and most games need that. It’s also not afraid to use lots of themes, something to keep all of the players interested; the Eternal Champion, the Companion to Champions, Law and Chaos, Antiheroes and so on. The Elric series deals with the Beast Lords and the Elemental Lords as well as the greater gods & demons of Law & Chaos, players love that kind of thing.

            Moorcock is one of the best examples of writing for roleplayers. Yup, the main thing Moorcock could teach GMs is how to handle themes, bringing them into games without over-planning. He is a master at hanging worlds on a theme and beating it to death.

  6. Metagaming Keys for SOY

    Hi there! 🙂

    I’m a friend of Kåre’s (Kåre Berg aka Negligent) on The Forge. K told me you had come up with something he called metagaming keys for SOY to keep the other players active when the GM is focusing on parts of the crew during rpg sessions.

    I’ve tried to search for these keys on The Forge, but been unsuccessful. Do you think you would be able to direct me to the post where you presented the idea? On beforehand, thank you very much.

    I’ve been playing SOY and other rpgs in a style inspired by the SOY key system for about a year. I love the system and the keys but the problem with players not being interested in the other players’ plots and in-game activities keeps appearing. I’m looking for tips on how to either encourage players to involve other characters in their characters’ plots, or tips on how to keep the players interested in the other players’ in-game actions.

  7. Metagaming Keys for SOY

    Hi there! 🙂

    I’m a friend of Kåre’s (Kåre Berg aka Negligent) on The Forge. K told me you had come up with something he called metagaming keys for SOY to keep the other players active when the GM is focusing on parts of the crew during rpg sessions.

    I’ve tried to search for these keys on The Forge, but been unsuccessful. Do you think you would be able to direct me to the post where you presented the idea? On beforehand, thank you very much.

    I’ve been playing SOY and other rpgs in a style inspired by the SOY key system for about a year. I love the system and the keys but the problem with players not being interested in the other players’ plots and in-game activities keeps appearing. I’m looking for tips on how to either encourage players to involve other characters in their characters’ plots, or tips on how to keep the players interested in the other players’ in-game actions.

  8. Pingback: Getting away from pre-gen characters in Lady Blackbird « Claw/Claw/Peck

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