Autumn Gray Friday

Reading: I just started Old Man’s War by John Scalzi and will likely pick up a book or two on the solar system. The only book I had was last updated in 1982.

Wearing: Blue sweater and jeans.

Planning: Trip out to visit the lady-friend this weekend.

Writing: I don’t want to jinx it but it is coming along, slowly but surely.

And you?

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57 thoughts on “Autumn Gray Friday

  1. reading: Some bad fantasy fiction. I want to pick up some horror.

    wearing: Black hoodie, jeans, boots.

    planning: Not a damn thing.

    writing: I have an idea. I don’t know if I’ll write it, though.

  2. reading: Some bad fantasy fiction. I want to pick up some horror.

    wearing: Black hoodie, jeans, boots.

    planning: Not a damn thing.

    writing: I have an idea. I don’t know if I’ll write it, though.

  3. reading: Some bad fantasy fiction. I want to pick up some horror.

    wearing: Black hoodie, jeans, boots.

    planning: Not a damn thing.

    writing: I have an idea. I don’t know if I’ll write it, though.

  4. Reading: I just got a stack of new books to review, so I should probably get started on them.

    Wearing: Khakis and a Linage II t-shirt

    Planning: Trail of Cthulhu one-shot and more World of Darkness plot twists

    Writing: a ghost story for the Halloween Horror series at Flames Rising and a new game project.

      • Re: WoD

        The game is heavily inspired by the Dresden Files, but keeps a handful of the WoD setting bits. I ditched Mage: the Awakening altogether, but kept the major Vampire Clans, for example.

        The characters are all mortals with some connection to the supernatural. We’re using a lot of stuff from Second Sight, Reliquary and other core books.

      • Re: WoD

        The game is heavily inspired by the Dresden Files, but keeps a handful of the WoD setting bits. I ditched Mage: the Awakening altogether, but kept the major Vampire Clans, for example.

        The characters are all mortals with some connection to the supernatural. We’re using a lot of stuff from Second Sight, Reliquary and other core books.

  5. Reading: I just got a stack of new books to review, so I should probably get started on them.

    Wearing: Khakis and a Linage II t-shirt

    Planning: Trail of Cthulhu one-shot and more World of Darkness plot twists

    Writing: a ghost story for the Halloween Horror series at Flames Rising and a new game project.

  6. Reading: I just got a stack of new books to review, so I should probably get started on them.

    Wearing: Khakis and a Linage II t-shirt

    Planning: Trail of Cthulhu one-shot and more World of Darkness plot twists

    Writing: a ghost story for the Halloween Horror series at Flames Rising and a new game project.

  7. Reading: Prey by Graham Masterton. Based very heavily on Lovecraft’s Dreams of the Witch House. Was kind of into it, but I’m not very impressed now that I’m getting nearer to the end.

    Wearing: Lots of layers and a red and black striped scarf. I am so cold today!

    Planning: About to do lots of travelling. Russell and I are spending a week with J.R. Blackwell and Jared Axelrod in North Carolina before being in their wedding party on the 11th. Fun fun. We are going to be a very sinister looking wedding party. I think we get capes! Ha ha!

    Writing: That’s not how I roll!

  8. Reading: Prey by Graham Masterton. Based very heavily on Lovecraft’s Dreams of the Witch House. Was kind of into it, but I’m not very impressed now that I’m getting nearer to the end.

    Wearing: Lots of layers and a red and black striped scarf. I am so cold today!

    Planning: About to do lots of travelling. Russell and I are spending a week with J.R. Blackwell and Jared Axelrod in North Carolina before being in their wedding party on the 11th. Fun fun. We are going to be a very sinister looking wedding party. I think we get capes! Ha ha!

    Writing: That’s not how I roll!

  9. Reading: Prey by Graham Masterton. Based very heavily on Lovecraft’s Dreams of the Witch House. Was kind of into it, but I’m not very impressed now that I’m getting nearer to the end.

    Wearing: Lots of layers and a red and black striped scarf. I am so cold today!

    Planning: About to do lots of travelling. Russell and I are spending a week with J.R. Blackwell and Jared Axelrod in North Carolina before being in their wedding party on the 11th. Fun fun. We are going to be a very sinister looking wedding party. I think we get capes! Ha ha!

    Writing: That’s not how I roll!

  10. R: Latro in the Mist, still. It’s long.

    W: Ripped up Pooh (as in Winnie the) t-shirt, as per house cleaning demands.

    P: New baby coming in the next couple of weeks!! Trying to get the house ready.

    W: Nothing at all. Hardly even doodling. So busy!

    PS – Pluto. Sheesh. I think we all have to read new Solar System books.

    • Latro in the Mist is a compilation of two books, Soldier in the Mist and Soldier of Arete, I believe. (I have both, but have yet to read them.) The third in the series, or, I guess, the second, from your point of view, is Soldier of Sidon.

      • Yeah, I’m only about halfway into Soldier in the Mist right now. A buddy at work tells me Soldier of Sidon is pretty tough reading, so we’ll see how hungry I am for more after I finish up this volume.

        • Gene Wolfe in general can be tough reading. Both he and the late John M. Ford would never insult their readers’ intelligence by overstating what they feel to be obvious. While I believe myself to be quite intelligent, I have often wished that they would insult me, just a little.

          (This doesn’t apply to Ford’s gaming supplements, which are just delightful.)

          The easiest Wolfe I’ve read is probably Pirate Freedom, although it’s not my favorite, and then, probably the Wizard Knight duology, which, while not easy going, has Wolfe actually stating some things clearly in a few places, to my utter astonishment. This may be because the books are (theoretically) for the YA market.

          • Wow! I’ll have to check those out. I’ve read the Book of the New Sun volumes (and the Urth of the New Sun), and I absolutely love the layers of stuff going on. I’m happy to have Latro deliver this as well.

            I’ll have to look into John M. Ford. Any recommendations?

            • Wolfe also wrote the Long Sun and Short Sun books (4 volumes and 3, respectively).

              John M. Ford. Hm. None of his books are like any of the others.

              Growing Up Weightless is a thematic sequel to The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, is excellent YA, and has a damned fine father-son relationship. It is also written almost entirely as a single tracking shot. Gorgeous.

              How Much For Just The Planet? is his Star Trek novel, original cast, as a musical comedy. The Final Reflection is THE Klingon novel, and I think Ford wrote the Klingon material for FASA’s Star Trek game.

              After each of his Star Trek novels, Paramount made a new rule: No one is ever allowed to do that again. Idiots.

              If you google for Making Light and John M. Ford, you should be able to find a page with links to a lot of his posts. He wrote a recipe for mammoth stew. He wrote a few scenes of “Harry of Five Points”, which is Henry V meets Guys and Dolls.

              He wrote The Last Hot Time, which was intended to be a novel in the shared series Borderlands. But it was a little too adult, so it was published as a standalone, with the serial numbers filed off.

              He wrote Web of Angels, sort of cyberpunk before it existed. Sort of.

              He wrote Princes of the Air, also sf, and um, just read it.

              He wrote Scholars of the Night, a sort of John Le Carre-ish thriller, but much shorter than le Carre writes.

              He wrote The Dragon Waiting, fantasy that — um, I can explain, but it’d be spoilery, but if you’re not really sharp, that might be a good thing.

              He wrote poetry. SF poetry. Fantasy poetry. Poetry on Christmas Cards he sent out — that then won a World Fantasy Award. Poetry I will read out loud. His most famous poem, not my favorite, for all that I love the city in which I live, the city he wrote the poem about, is “110 Stories”. Google for it — it’s on the net.

              He wrote short stories.

              He wrote short stories and poems for the shared world, Liavek, which may be unique among the shared world series in that each book clearly advanced time and the final book was clearly planned as the final book, wrapping things up perfectly. After a story that Ford did not write, where exactly the right characters meet, the final book ends with a poem by Ford that left me breathless and tear stained.

              He wrote The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues for Paranoia. He wrote or co-authored some GURPS books, including GURPS Time Travel.

              He lived with death on his shoulder for years. As in, he died too damned young — but at least a decade past when his doctors had expected. This was in no small part thanks to the late Robert Jordan, who footed a lot of the medical bills. When Ford dedicated one of his books to the doctors who “kept the lights on”, he was not being whimsical.

              Bloody hell. Email me if you want me to blather more about him. It’s drcpunk followed by that old at sign then labcats and the period and then org.

            • Wolfe also wrote the Long Sun and Short Sun books (4 volumes and 3, respectively).

              John M. Ford. Hm. None of his books are like any of the others.

              Growing Up Weightless is a thematic sequel to The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, is excellent YA, and has a damned fine father-son relationship. It is also written almost entirely as a single tracking shot. Gorgeous.

              How Much For Just The Planet? is his Star Trek novel, original cast, as a musical comedy. The Final Reflection is THE Klingon novel, and I think Ford wrote the Klingon material for FASA’s Star Trek game.

              After each of his Star Trek novels, Paramount made a new rule: No one is ever allowed to do that again. Idiots.

              If you google for Making Light and John M. Ford, you should be able to find a page with links to a lot of his posts. He wrote a recipe for mammoth stew. He wrote a few scenes of “Harry of Five Points”, which is Henry V meets Guys and Dolls.

              He wrote The Last Hot Time, which was intended to be a novel in the shared series Borderlands. But it was a little too adult, so it was published as a standalone, with the serial numbers filed off.

              He wrote Web of Angels, sort of cyberpunk before it existed. Sort of.

              He wrote Princes of the Air, also sf, and um, just read it.

              He wrote Scholars of the Night, a sort of John Le Carre-ish thriller, but much shorter than le Carre writes.

              He wrote The Dragon Waiting, fantasy that — um, I can explain, but it’d be spoilery, but if you’re not really sharp, that might be a good thing.

              He wrote poetry. SF poetry. Fantasy poetry. Poetry on Christmas Cards he sent out — that then won a World Fantasy Award. Poetry I will read out loud. His most famous poem, not my favorite, for all that I love the city in which I live, the city he wrote the poem about, is “110 Stories”. Google for it — it’s on the net.

              He wrote short stories.

              He wrote short stories and poems for the shared world, Liavek, which may be unique among the shared world series in that each book clearly advanced time and the final book was clearly planned as the final book, wrapping things up perfectly. After a story that Ford did not write, where exactly the right characters meet, the final book ends with a poem by Ford that left me breathless and tear stained.

              He wrote The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues for Paranoia. He wrote or co-authored some GURPS books, including GURPS Time Travel.

              He lived with death on his shoulder for years. As in, he died too damned young — but at least a decade past when his doctors had expected. This was in no small part thanks to the late Robert Jordan, who footed a lot of the medical bills. When Ford dedicated one of his books to the doctors who “kept the lights on”, he was not being whimsical.

              Bloody hell. Email me if you want me to blather more about him. It’s drcpunk followed by that old at sign then labcats and the period and then org.

          • Wow! I’ll have to check those out. I’ve read the Book of the New Sun volumes (and the Urth of the New Sun), and I absolutely love the layers of stuff going on. I’m happy to have Latro deliver this as well.

            I’ll have to look into John M. Ford. Any recommendations?

        • Gene Wolfe in general can be tough reading. Both he and the late John M. Ford would never insult their readers’ intelligence by overstating what they feel to be obvious. While I believe myself to be quite intelligent, I have often wished that they would insult me, just a little.

          (This doesn’t apply to Ford’s gaming supplements, which are just delightful.)

          The easiest Wolfe I’ve read is probably Pirate Freedom, although it’s not my favorite, and then, probably the Wizard Knight duology, which, while not easy going, has Wolfe actually stating some things clearly in a few places, to my utter astonishment. This may be because the books are (theoretically) for the YA market.

      • Yeah, I’m only about halfway into Soldier in the Mist right now. A buddy at work tells me Soldier of Sidon is pretty tough reading, so we’ll see how hungry I am for more after I finish up this volume.

    • Latro in the Mist is a compilation of two books, Soldier in the Mist and Soldier of Arete, I believe. (I have both, but have yet to read them.) The third in the series, or, I guess, the second, from your point of view, is Soldier of Sidon.

  11. R: Latro in the Mist, still. It’s long.

    W: Ripped up Pooh (as in Winnie the) t-shirt, as per house cleaning demands.

    P: New baby coming in the next couple of weeks!! Trying to get the house ready.

    W: Nothing at all. Hardly even doodling. So busy!

    PS – Pluto. Sheesh. I think we all have to read new Solar System books.

  12. R: Latro in the Mist, still. It’s long.

    W: Ripped up Pooh (as in Winnie the) t-shirt, as per house cleaning demands.

    P: New baby coming in the next couple of weeks!! Trying to get the house ready.

    W: Nothing at all. Hardly even doodling. So busy!

    PS – Pluto. Sheesh. I think we all have to read new Solar System books.

  13. Re: WoD

    The game is heavily inspired by the Dresden Files, but keeps a handful of the WoD setting bits. I ditched Mage: the Awakening altogether, but kept the major Vampire Clans, for example.

    The characters are all mortals with some connection to the supernatural. We’re using a lot of stuff from Second Sight, Reliquary and other core books.

  14. Latro in the Mist is a compilation of two books, Soldier in the Mist and Soldier of Arete, I believe. (I have both, but have yet to read them.) The third in the series, or, I guess, the second, from your point of view, is Soldier of Sidon.

  15. Reading: The latest issue of Alarums and Excursions and The Graveyard Book, which has pushed all the other books I’m in the middle of aside. I’m reading it aloud, so it’s going to take a bit longer than usual, but ghods, it’s worth it.

    Wearing: T-shirt for the 2008 Chicago WorldCon Bit (To Serve Fan), blue jeans.

    Planning: Job hunting, of course. Starting up a game of Candlewick Manor / Monsters and Other Childish Things. Straightening out medical bills. Getting a wedding present for a friend’s wedding.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions. Maybe some more of my WorldCon report. Preque Vue — high time to push on the writing to get the larp viable.

  16. Reading: The latest issue of Alarums and Excursions and The Graveyard Book, which has pushed all the other books I’m in the middle of aside. I’m reading it aloud, so it’s going to take a bit longer than usual, but ghods, it’s worth it.

    Wearing: T-shirt for the 2008 Chicago WorldCon Bit (To Serve Fan), blue jeans.

    Planning: Job hunting, of course. Starting up a game of Candlewick Manor / Monsters and Other Childish Things. Straightening out medical bills. Getting a wedding present for a friend’s wedding.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions. Maybe some more of my WorldCon report. Preque Vue — high time to push on the writing to get the larp viable.

  17. Reading: The latest issue of Alarums and Excursions and The Graveyard Book, which has pushed all the other books I’m in the middle of aside. I’m reading it aloud, so it’s going to take a bit longer than usual, but ghods, it’s worth it.

    Wearing: T-shirt for the 2008 Chicago WorldCon Bit (To Serve Fan), blue jeans.

    Planning: Job hunting, of course. Starting up a game of Candlewick Manor / Monsters and Other Childish Things. Straightening out medical bills. Getting a wedding present for a friend’s wedding.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions. Maybe some more of my WorldCon report. Preque Vue — high time to push on the writing to get the larp viable.

  18. Yeah, I’m only about halfway into Soldier in the Mist right now. A buddy at work tells me Soldier of Sidon is pretty tough reading, so we’ll see how hungry I am for more after I finish up this volume.

  19. Gene Wolfe in general can be tough reading. Both he and the late John M. Ford would never insult their readers’ intelligence by overstating what they feel to be obvious. While I believe myself to be quite intelligent, I have often wished that they would insult me, just a little.

    (This doesn’t apply to Ford’s gaming supplements, which are just delightful.)

    The easiest Wolfe I’ve read is probably Pirate Freedom, although it’s not my favorite, and then, probably the Wizard Knight duology, which, while not easy going, has Wolfe actually stating some things clearly in a few places, to my utter astonishment. This may be because the books are (theoretically) for the YA market.

  20. Wow! I’ll have to check those out. I’ve read the Book of the New Sun volumes (and the Urth of the New Sun), and I absolutely love the layers of stuff going on. I’m happy to have Latro deliver this as well.

    I’ll have to look into John M. Ford. Any recommendations?

  21. Wolfe also wrote the Long Sun and Short Sun books (4 volumes and 3, respectively).

    John M. Ford. Hm. None of his books are like any of the others.

    Growing Up Weightless is a thematic sequel to The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, is excellent YA, and has a damned fine father-son relationship. It is also written almost entirely as a single tracking shot. Gorgeous.

    How Much For Just The Planet? is his Star Trek novel, original cast, as a musical comedy. The Final Reflection is THE Klingon novel, and I think Ford wrote the Klingon material for FASA’s Star Trek game.

    After each of his Star Trek novels, Paramount made a new rule: No one is ever allowed to do that again. Idiots.

    If you google for Making Light and John M. Ford, you should be able to find a page with links to a lot of his posts. He wrote a recipe for mammoth stew. He wrote a few scenes of “Harry of Five Points”, which is Henry V meets Guys and Dolls.

    He wrote The Last Hot Time, which was intended to be a novel in the shared series Borderlands. But it was a little too adult, so it was published as a standalone, with the serial numbers filed off.

    He wrote Web of Angels, sort of cyberpunk before it existed. Sort of.

    He wrote Princes of the Air, also sf, and um, just read it.

    He wrote Scholars of the Night, a sort of John Le Carre-ish thriller, but much shorter than le Carre writes.

    He wrote The Dragon Waiting, fantasy that — um, I can explain, but it’d be spoilery, but if you’re not really sharp, that might be a good thing.

    He wrote poetry. SF poetry. Fantasy poetry. Poetry on Christmas Cards he sent out — that then won a World Fantasy Award. Poetry I will read out loud. His most famous poem, not my favorite, for all that I love the city in which I live, the city he wrote the poem about, is “110 Stories”. Google for it — it’s on the net.

    He wrote short stories.

    He wrote short stories and poems for the shared world, Liavek, which may be unique among the shared world series in that each book clearly advanced time and the final book was clearly planned as the final book, wrapping things up perfectly. After a story that Ford did not write, where exactly the right characters meet, the final book ends with a poem by Ford that left me breathless and tear stained.

    He wrote The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues for Paranoia. He wrote or co-authored some GURPS books, including GURPS Time Travel.

    He lived with death on his shoulder for years. As in, he died too damned young — but at least a decade past when his doctors had expected. This was in no small part thanks to the late Robert Jordan, who footed a lot of the medical bills. When Ford dedicated one of his books to the doctors who “kept the lights on”, he was not being whimsical.

    Bloody hell. Email me if you want me to blather more about him. It’s drcpunk followed by that old at sign then labcats and the period and then org.

  22. Holy cow. Lots of info! Thanks! I’ll check my library system (woefully inadequate) for some of these once I tackle Latro.

    Weirdly, How Much for Just the Planet? was one of my first novels owned back when I started reading fiction. I can’t remember a bit of it, though.

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