Mouse Guard RPG Mini-Review

Mouse Guard Roleplaying Game Mouse Guard Roleplaying Game by Luke Crane

My review


rating: 5 of 5 stars
This is a must-have for those who enjoyed the graphic novel, those who enjoyed Brian Jaques Redwall books (but maybe wanted a bit more moral ambiguity) and those who want to game with their kids.

The game text has set a new high mark for RPG’s, a mark previously held, to my mind, by Dogs in the Vineyard in that it is clear, tells you how to play it, leaves so much room for invention and creation within a fun structure.

It is always a good sign when I finish reading a game and cannot wait to play. I cannot wait; I am chomping at the bit.

I am a grown man who cannot wait to gather with his friends and pretend to be mice with swords.

View all my reviews.

Note: The fact that this post will irritate Shreyas is not its purpose but is clearly a welcome side effect.

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68 thoughts on “Mouse Guard RPG Mini-Review

  1. I couldn’t agree more, Judd. This is an amazing game and I can’t wait to try it out. I was a huge fan of Redwall when I was younger but grew out of its repetitive plots and predictable characters. I don’t have the words to say how excited I am about Mouse Guard and what is, for me, a “new” and refreshing take on the stories of my earlier years.

    (Mike)

    • The Gray Area and Food

      I hear ya.

      Yeah, the Mouse Guard graphic novel was like the Redwall book but without all of the moral certainty (and without the awesome food descriptions…holy shit, those books made me hungry).

    • The Gray Area and Food

      I hear ya.

      Yeah, the Mouse Guard graphic novel was like the Redwall book but without all of the moral certainty (and without the awesome food descriptions…holy shit, those books made me hungry).

    • The Gray Area and Food

      I hear ya.

      Yeah, the Mouse Guard graphic novel was like the Redwall book but without all of the moral certainty (and without the awesome food descriptions…holy shit, those books made me hungry).

  2. I couldn’t agree more, Judd. This is an amazing game and I can’t wait to try it out. I was a huge fan of Redwall when I was younger but grew out of its repetitive plots and predictable characters. I don’t have the words to say how excited I am about Mouse Guard and what is, for me, a “new” and refreshing take on the stories of my earlier years.

    (Mike)

  3. I couldn’t agree more, Judd. This is an amazing game and I can’t wait to try it out. I was a huge fan of Redwall when I was younger but grew out of its repetitive plots and predictable characters. I don’t have the words to say how excited I am about Mouse Guard and what is, for me, a “new” and refreshing take on the stories of my earlier years.

    (Mike)

  4. I couldn’t agree more, Judd. This is an amazing game and I can’t wait to try it out. I was a huge fan of Redwall when I was younger but grew out of its repetitive plots and predictable characters. I don’t have the words to say how excited I am about Mouse Guard and what is, for me, a “new” and refreshing take on the stories of my earlier years.

    (Mike)

    • Redwall

      I really enjoyed the first Redwall book and then there was this book, later in the series, where a stoat child was living in Redwall. The citizens of Redwall were all touchy because the kid was a stoat or a weasel or some shit and thought he would go bad because of the kind of creature he was, despite having grown up in a supportive Redwall home.

      The kid went bad.

      It was a horrendously racist metaphor.

      I need to read it over and write about it in a more in depth manner.

      But yeah, the first two or three Redwall books rocked.

    • Redwall

      I really enjoyed the first Redwall book and then there was this book, later in the series, where a stoat child was living in Redwall. The citizens of Redwall were all touchy because the kid was a stoat or a weasel or some shit and thought he would go bad because of the kind of creature he was, despite having grown up in a supportive Redwall home.

      The kid went bad.

      It was a horrendously racist metaphor.

      I need to read it over and write about it in a more in depth manner.

      But yeah, the first two or three Redwall books rocked.

    • Redwall

      I really enjoyed the first Redwall book and then there was this book, later in the series, where a stoat child was living in Redwall. The citizens of Redwall were all touchy because the kid was a stoat or a weasel or some shit and thought he would go bad because of the kind of creature he was, despite having grown up in a supportive Redwall home.

      The kid went bad.

      It was a horrendously racist metaphor.

      I need to read it over and write about it in a more in depth manner.

      But yeah, the first two or three Redwall books rocked.

  5. Redwall

    I really enjoyed the first Redwall book and then there was this book, later in the series, where a stoat child was living in Redwall. The citizens of Redwall were all touchy because the kid was a stoat or a weasel or some shit and thought he would go bad because of the kind of creature he was, despite having grown up in a supportive Redwall home.

    The kid went bad.

    It was a horrendously racist metaphor.

    I need to read it over and write about it in a more in depth manner.

    But yeah, the first two or three Redwall books rocked.

  6. The Gray Area and Food

    I hear ya.

    Yeah, the Mouse Guard graphic novel was like the Redwall book but without all of the moral certainty (and without the awesome food descriptions…holy shit, those books made me hungry).

  7. Re: Redwall

    There was a lot of regrettably racist stuff going on, I agree.

    Also, lol at “supportive Redwall home.”

    Suzanne Collins does a much better job at characterizing animal species without getting mired in racism in Gregor the Overlander.

  8. <>“The game text has set a new high mark for RPG’s, a mark previously held, to my mind, by Dogs in the Vineyard in that it is clear, tells you how to play it, leaves so much room for invention and creation within a fun structure.”<>

    Maybe. It also reads like every other BW product I have. There’s something about the structure and the voice that just doesn’t gel with the illustrations for me. It sounds like BW rather than Mouse Guard.

    That said, I too wish to play a stalwart mouse with a sword (Halberd actually).

    I also have a keen desire to play “Burrows of the Weasel”.

    Hopefully there will be some playtest games coming out soon (or maybe I can run one for some local folks here).

    later
    Tom

      • Re: Weasel War II

        Overall, Luke writes in a more direct style than the way many other RPGs are written – a disinterested commentator, for lack of a better term. It’s in your face, which I’m into, but seems to turn many people off.

        I haven’t read the final text yet, but even between BE and BW there are major differences in tone, it’s just the same general style.

      • Re: Weasel War II

        Overall, Luke writes in a more direct style than the way many other RPGs are written – a disinterested commentator, for lack of a better term. It’s in your face, which I’m into, but seems to turn many people off.

        I haven’t read the final text yet, but even between BE and BW there are major differences in tone, it’s just the same general style.

      • Re: Weasel War II

        Overall, Luke writes in a more direct style than the way many other RPGs are written – a disinterested commentator, for lack of a better term. It’s in your face, which I’m into, but seems to turn many people off.

        I haven’t read the final text yet, but even between BE and BW there are major differences in tone, it’s just the same general style.

  9. <>“The game text has set a new high mark for RPG’s, a mark previously held, to my mind, by Dogs in the Vineyard in that it is clear, tells you how to play it, leaves so much room for invention and creation within a fun structure.”<>

    Maybe. It also reads like every other BW product I have. There’s something about the structure and the voice that just doesn’t gel with the illustrations for me. It sounds like BW rather than Mouse Guard.

    That said, I too wish to play a stalwart mouse with a sword (Halberd actually).

    I also have a keen desire to play “Burrows of the Weasel”.

    Hopefully there will be some playtest games coming out soon (or maybe I can run one for some local folks here).

    later
    Tom

  10. <>“The game text has set a new high mark for RPG’s, a mark previously held, to my mind, by Dogs in the Vineyard in that it is clear, tells you how to play it, leaves so much room for invention and creation within a fun structure.”<>

    Maybe. It also reads like every other BW product I have. There’s something about the structure and the voice that just doesn’t gel with the illustrations for me. It sounds like BW rather than Mouse Guard.

    That said, I too wish to play a stalwart mouse with a sword (Halberd actually).

    I also have a keen desire to play “Burrows of the Weasel”.

    Hopefully there will be some playtest games coming out soon (or maybe I can run one for some local folks here).

    later
    Tom

  11. <>“The game text has set a new high mark for RPG’s, a mark previously held, to my mind, by Dogs in the Vineyard in that it is clear, tells you how to play it, leaves so much room for invention and creation within a fun structure.”<>

    Maybe. It also reads like every other BW product I have. There’s something about the structure and the voice that just doesn’t gel with the illustrations for me. It sounds like BW rather than Mouse Guard.

    That said, I too wish to play a stalwart mouse with a sword (Halberd actually).

    I also have a keen desire to play “Burrows of the Weasel”.

    Hopefully there will be some playtest games coming out soon (or maybe I can run one for some local folks here).

    later
    Tom

  12. Someone in our circle who doesn’t play RPGs said several months ago the only way she’d ever run a game is if it were “talking mice in ancient Rome.” I provided her with the link to the MG rpg and told her I was holding her to that, and she blanched with fear.

    Now, with a little minor setting retooling, I can actually follow through on my threat. mwah-ha-ha

  13. Someone in our circle who doesn’t play RPGs said several months ago the only way she’d ever run a game is if it were “talking mice in ancient Rome.” I provided her with the link to the MG rpg and told her I was holding her to that, and she blanched with fear.

    Now, with a little minor setting retooling, I can actually follow through on my threat. mwah-ha-ha

  14. Someone in our circle who doesn’t play RPGs said several months ago the only way she’d ever run a game is if it were “talking mice in ancient Rome.” I provided her with the link to the MG rpg and told her I was holding her to that, and she blanched with fear.

    Now, with a little minor setting retooling, I can actually follow through on my threat. mwah-ha-ha

  15. Someone in our circle who doesn’t play RPGs said several months ago the only way she’d ever run a game is if it were “talking mice in ancient Rome.” I provided her with the link to the MG rpg and told her I was holding her to that, and she blanched with fear.

    Now, with a little minor setting retooling, I can actually follow through on my threat. mwah-ha-ha

  16. Re: Weasel War II

    Overall, Luke writes in a more direct style than the way many other RPGs are written – a disinterested commentator, for lack of a better term. It’s in your face, which I’m into, but seems to turn many people off.

    I haven’t read the final text yet, but even between BE and BW there are major differences in tone, it’s just the same general style.

  17. After playing my first Burning Wheel, a demo last night, and beginning to read the MG book, I can’t believe I actually want to ditch my In a Wicked Age and PTA stylings to play something so rich with mechanics. This was not expected.

  18. After playing my first Burning Wheel, a demo last night, and beginning to read the MG book, I can’t believe I actually want to ditch my In a Wicked Age and PTA stylings to play something so rich with mechanics. This was not expected.

  19. After playing my first Burning Wheel, a demo last night, and beginning to read the MG book, I can’t believe I actually want to ditch my In a Wicked Age and PTA stylings to play something so rich with mechanics. This was not expected.

  20. After playing my first Burning Wheel, a demo last night, and beginning to read the MG book, I can’t believe I actually want to ditch my In a Wicked Age and PTA stylings to play something so rich with mechanics. This was not expected.

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