Solo TPK

The Horselord Prince and the Khan of the Steppes

That’s the thing with rolling dice out in the open and pushing on their Beliefs until they make rough decisions: the story might end up being a tragedy.

Has anyone ever had a TPK at their table or a particularly brutal death that cut a PC’s legacy short?

Do tell…

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56 thoughts on “Solo TPK

  1. Hey Judd! Yeah, in the Godlike campaign I’m running we’re rolling out in the open and the result has been more than a few shocking PC deaths. Lots of characters have built up quite a bit of backstory and attachment in the game, only to be struck down mercilessly when the bullets start flying. There is a real sense of loss. But the players seem to love this aspect of it (in some masochistic way I guess).

    It’s all in keeping with the tone of the game we all bought into so it’s all good.

    • Godlike Head Shots

      Dude, Godlike. Yeah, everyone is one headshot away from instant obliteration in that game. I ran a one-shot of the scenario in the book and it was a really rough scenario. A hyper-sniper and a power-nullifier worked together and killed the guy who was being the spotter, who thought he could go Shadowcat on ’em. Rough.

      When playing a gritty WWII super-powered game whose theme is, you are bigger than most people but the war is bigger than you, I could see how that would be a solid mode of play.

      • Re: Godlike Head Shots

        Yeah, now that you mention it I think we’ve been playing to the “You are larger than life, but the war is larger than you,” vibe pretty closely.

        Personally I love it. It makes the deaths of characters that have manage to survive for a while and flesh out their portrayal really hurt, a real shock. Many of the PC deaths in the game have seemed unfair, cruel fates for the ones that died. But I’ll be damned if it doesn’t say things about the pain of war that I have not experienced in other games.

        We had a character go out a session or two ago. He just got unlucky and was killed by an artillery round. He was a great character, one we all liked, and the player gave him a relatively happy personality. For the other characters, he was like a bright spot in all the horror around them, and then that horror reached out and took him.

        What a gut punch. He didn’t deserve to die, but y’know, in war, deserve’s got nuthin7 to do with it.

        • Re: Godlike Head Shots

          I also want to add, that somehow, I think the group has been playing their characters so that rather than having a “satisfying death” narratively speaking (because there really isn’t a satisfying death in a gritty war story), they’re playing their characters so that they have a satisfying /life/, because that’s what needs to be remembered.

          Makes it all very emotional, even profound, and by god, these are some satisfying game sessions we’re having.

          • Re: Godlike Head Shots

            Man, fantastic.

            Those paragraphs in your posts above should be strung together and put in an AP thread. I am sure the writers of Godlike would love to read about people really getting it and getting into it.

          • Re: Godlike Head Shots

            Man, fantastic.

            Those paragraphs in your posts above should be strung together and put in an AP thread. I am sure the writers of Godlike would love to read about people really getting it and getting into it.

        • Re: Godlike Head Shots

          I also want to add, that somehow, I think the group has been playing their characters so that rather than having a “satisfying death” narratively speaking (because there really isn’t a satisfying death in a gritty war story), they’re playing their characters so that they have a satisfying /life/, because that’s what needs to be remembered.

          Makes it all very emotional, even profound, and by god, these are some satisfying game sessions we’re having.

      • Re: Godlike Head Shots

        Yeah, now that you mention it I think we’ve been playing to the “You are larger than life, but the war is larger than you,” vibe pretty closely.

        Personally I love it. It makes the deaths of characters that have manage to survive for a while and flesh out their portrayal really hurt, a real shock. Many of the PC deaths in the game have seemed unfair, cruel fates for the ones that died. But I’ll be damned if it doesn’t say things about the pain of war that I have not experienced in other games.

        We had a character go out a session or two ago. He just got unlucky and was killed by an artillery round. He was a great character, one we all liked, and the player gave him a relatively happy personality. For the other characters, he was like a bright spot in all the horror around them, and then that horror reached out and took him.

        What a gut punch. He didn’t deserve to die, but y’know, in war, deserve’s got nuthin7 to do with it.

    • Godlike Head Shots

      Dude, Godlike. Yeah, everyone is one headshot away from instant obliteration in that game. I ran a one-shot of the scenario in the book and it was a really rough scenario. A hyper-sniper and a power-nullifier worked together and killed the guy who was being the spotter, who thought he could go Shadowcat on ’em. Rough.

      When playing a gritty WWII super-powered game whose theme is, you are bigger than most people but the war is bigger than you, I could see how that would be a solid mode of play.

  2. Hey Judd! Yeah, in the Godlike campaign I’m running we’re rolling out in the open and the result has been more than a few shocking PC deaths. Lots of characters have built up quite a bit of backstory and attachment in the game, only to be struck down mercilessly when the bullets start flying. There is a real sense of loss. But the players seem to love this aspect of it (in some masochistic way I guess).

    It’s all in keeping with the tone of the game we all bought into so it’s all good.

  3. Hey Judd! Yeah, in the Godlike campaign I’m running we’re rolling out in the open and the result has been more than a few shocking PC deaths. Lots of characters have built up quite a bit of backstory and attachment in the game, only to be struck down mercilessly when the bullets start flying. There is a real sense of loss. But the players seem to love this aspect of it (in some masochistic way I guess).

    It’s all in keeping with the tone of the game we all bought into so it’s all good.

  4. Hey Judd! Yeah, in the Godlike campaign I’m running we’re rolling out in the open and the result has been more than a few shocking PC deaths. Lots of characters have built up quite a bit of backstory and attachment in the game, only to be struck down mercilessly when the bullets start flying. There is a real sense of loss. But the players seem to love this aspect of it (in some masochistic way I guess).

    It’s all in keeping with the tone of the game we all bought into so it’s all good.

  5. I’ve never had a TPK in a game where I’ve been the GM, but I was in one Star Wars game where our ship was attacked in the first session and destroyed within an hour of the game starting.

    One of the most brutal deaths I’ve seen as a GM was in a Conspiracy X campaign where two PC’s turned on each other and shot each other to death.

  6. I’ve never had a TPK in a game where I’ve been the GM, but I was in one Star Wars game where our ship was attacked in the first session and destroyed within an hour of the game starting.

    One of the most brutal deaths I’ve seen as a GM was in a Conspiracy X campaign where two PC’s turned on each other and shot each other to death.

  7. I’ve never had a TPK in a game where I’ve been the GM, but I was in one Star Wars game where our ship was attacked in the first session and destroyed within an hour of the game starting.

    One of the most brutal deaths I’ve seen as a GM was in a Conspiracy X campaign where two PC’s turned on each other and shot each other to death.

  8. I’ve never had a TPK in a game where I’ve been the GM, but I was in one Star Wars game where our ship was attacked in the first session and destroyed within an hour of the game starting.

    One of the most brutal deaths I’ve seen as a GM was in a Conspiracy X campaign where two PC’s turned on each other and shot each other to death.

  9. I’ve seen in a bunch, even in games like The Mountain Witch where PC death is assumed, when players place a lot of investment in ensuring certain narrative outcomes, rather than expressing their character through actions along the way.

    If a player or group feels that a character has not had adequate opportunities for their nature to be expressed before they die, that’s a bummer. And players sometimes want to express things like “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” but sometimes the mechanics prevent you from expressing that (guy gets killed before getting his chance in the spotlight). So there’s a knack to knowing what the mechanics of the game support, as far as character concepts that’ll have an opportunity to be expressed.

    • Goblin Shiv to the Eye

      I hear ya.

      Sometimes, I wonder if the “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” has to be open to his character actually being the, “When the chips are down, I’m the guy who is going to die trying to pull the group through.” But there are definitely deaths that would be less than satisfying and don’t address what the character is about at all and those are particularly rough.

      Nobody likes taking a goblin shiv to the eye.

      • Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

        I just had a character die in a less than appropriate way just recently, and I’ve considered and addressed this issue before.

        I think that it depends on the game you’re running and what you and your players agree to.

        If you’re running a game where dice rolling is out in the open then you need to be playing a brutal game.

        Of course, this can still bite you in the ass. I ran a game of Cyberpunk and expected to take at least a quarter of the party out with the final massive corporate attack. Not one of the party members died because of sheer luck, and also because of some crazy good rolls on the part of the players.

        They were okay with it, and if I had had a chance to continue a future campaign there would definitely have been senseless character deaths.

        However, if you’re running a game like Houses of the Blooded, or L5R where death and sacrifice are far more important to the story then every death should come as a personal stab at the heart strings of every player. A character’s death may come at any moment, and even seem senseless prima facia, but it should represent something deeper. The example I’m thinking of is, of course, the death of the master swordsman in Seven Samurai. He is the definition of bushido honor and glory, killing far more enemies than any one other person in the movie, but a single bullet fired from hiding by a coward destroys the perfection that this man represents. That is the sort of death I aspire to create for every one of my players’ characters.

        In dramatic games I don’t shy away from death, just senseless death, and I will fully embrace it if it is appropriate for the story. So the answer is that it depends on what type of story you are telling.

        • Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

          Sadly most games don’t have a separate mechanic for death vs. senseless death. Some games do though:

          MouseGuard. You can’t die in a test, only in a conflict. And when conflicts start, you know if your life is on the line.

          The Shadow of Yesterday: No named character can die unless the players opt to “Bring Down the Pain” which puts both their characters and NPCs lives in danger.

          Dogs in the Vineyard: A dog can always give if fallout would potentially kill him.

          So, I think there are mechanical ways to prevent senseless death, but it might mean limiting the systems you use, or creating hacks for other systems.

          Also, as you pointed out, the master swordsman’s death from the outside appears senseless, like a random crit from a goblin shiv, but in the context of the story it emphasized the impermanence of life and the cruelty of their world. Very much like Cohen brothers movies now that I think about it.

        • Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

          Sadly most games don’t have a separate mechanic for death vs. senseless death. Some games do though:

          MouseGuard. You can’t die in a test, only in a conflict. And when conflicts start, you know if your life is on the line.

          The Shadow of Yesterday: No named character can die unless the players opt to “Bring Down the Pain” which puts both their characters and NPCs lives in danger.

          Dogs in the Vineyard: A dog can always give if fallout would potentially kill him.

          So, I think there are mechanical ways to prevent senseless death, but it might mean limiting the systems you use, or creating hacks for other systems.

          Also, as you pointed out, the master swordsman’s death from the outside appears senseless, like a random crit from a goblin shiv, but in the context of the story it emphasized the impermanence of life and the cruelty of their world. Very much like Cohen brothers movies now that I think about it.

      • Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

        I just had a character die in a less than appropriate way just recently, and I’ve considered and addressed this issue before.

        I think that it depends on the game you’re running and what you and your players agree to.

        If you’re running a game where dice rolling is out in the open then you need to be playing a brutal game.

        Of course, this can still bite you in the ass. I ran a game of Cyberpunk and expected to take at least a quarter of the party out with the final massive corporate attack. Not one of the party members died because of sheer luck, and also because of some crazy good rolls on the part of the players.

        They were okay with it, and if I had had a chance to continue a future campaign there would definitely have been senseless character deaths.

        However, if you’re running a game like Houses of the Blooded, or L5R where death and sacrifice are far more important to the story then every death should come as a personal stab at the heart strings of every player. A character’s death may come at any moment, and even seem senseless prima facia, but it should represent something deeper. The example I’m thinking of is, of course, the death of the master swordsman in Seven Samurai. He is the definition of bushido honor and glory, killing far more enemies than any one other person in the movie, but a single bullet fired from hiding by a coward destroys the perfection that this man represents. That is the sort of death I aspire to create for every one of my players’ characters.

        In dramatic games I don’t shy away from death, just senseless death, and I will fully embrace it if it is appropriate for the story. So the answer is that it depends on what type of story you are telling.

    • Goblin Shiv to the Eye

      I hear ya.

      Sometimes, I wonder if the “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” has to be open to his character actually being the, “When the chips are down, I’m the guy who is going to die trying to pull the group through.” But there are definitely deaths that would be less than satisfying and don’t address what the character is about at all and those are particularly rough.

      Nobody likes taking a goblin shiv to the eye.

  10. I’ve seen in a bunch, even in games like The Mountain Witch where PC death is assumed, when players place a lot of investment in ensuring certain narrative outcomes, rather than expressing their character through actions along the way.

    If a player or group feels that a character has not had adequate opportunities for their nature to be expressed before they die, that’s a bummer. And players sometimes want to express things like “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” but sometimes the mechanics prevent you from expressing that (guy gets killed before getting his chance in the spotlight). So there’s a knack to knowing what the mechanics of the game support, as far as character concepts that’ll have an opportunity to be expressed.

  11. I’ve seen in a bunch, even in games like The Mountain Witch where PC death is assumed, when players place a lot of investment in ensuring certain narrative outcomes, rather than expressing their character through actions along the way.

    If a player or group feels that a character has not had adequate opportunities for their nature to be expressed before they die, that’s a bummer. And players sometimes want to express things like “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” but sometimes the mechanics prevent you from expressing that (guy gets killed before getting his chance in the spotlight). So there’s a knack to knowing what the mechanics of the game support, as far as character concepts that’ll have an opportunity to be expressed.

  12. I’ve seen in a bunch, even in games like The Mountain Witch where PC death is assumed, when players place a lot of investment in ensuring certain narrative outcomes, rather than expressing their character through actions along the way.

    If a player or group feels that a character has not had adequate opportunities for their nature to be expressed before they die, that’s a bummer. And players sometimes want to express things like “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” but sometimes the mechanics prevent you from expressing that (guy gets killed before getting his chance in the spotlight). So there’s a knack to knowing what the mechanics of the game support, as far as character concepts that’ll have an opportunity to be expressed.

  13. No TPK’s, but waaay back when playing the original Cyberpunk (the one with rules derived from FBI shooting stats = very deadly), we had a number of really quick, really ugly deaths.

    One of the more memorable in recent gaming was more of a sacrifice – It was my long-running modern occult game, and the characters had journeyed into the realm of the frost giants to free an ancient river. To break the final bindings in the deeps of the giant’s castle, they needed to use heart’s blood (enough for a death, not just a wound). So the half-giant swordsman sacrificed himself to free the river. It was unexpected and deeply moving.

  14. No TPK’s, but waaay back when playing the original Cyberpunk (the one with rules derived from FBI shooting stats = very deadly), we had a number of really quick, really ugly deaths.

    One of the more memorable in recent gaming was more of a sacrifice – It was my long-running modern occult game, and the characters had journeyed into the realm of the frost giants to free an ancient river. To break the final bindings in the deeps of the giant’s castle, they needed to use heart’s blood (enough for a death, not just a wound). So the half-giant swordsman sacrificed himself to free the river. It was unexpected and deeply moving.

  15. No TPK’s, but waaay back when playing the original Cyberpunk (the one with rules derived from FBI shooting stats = very deadly), we had a number of really quick, really ugly deaths.

    One of the more memorable in recent gaming was more of a sacrifice – It was my long-running modern occult game, and the characters had journeyed into the realm of the frost giants to free an ancient river. To break the final bindings in the deeps of the giant’s castle, they needed to use heart’s blood (enough for a death, not just a wound). So the half-giant swordsman sacrificed himself to free the river. It was unexpected and deeply moving.

  16. No TPK’s, but waaay back when playing the original Cyberpunk (the one with rules derived from FBI shooting stats = very deadly), we had a number of really quick, really ugly deaths.

    One of the more memorable in recent gaming was more of a sacrifice – It was my long-running modern occult game, and the characters had journeyed into the realm of the frost giants to free an ancient river. To break the final bindings in the deeps of the giant’s castle, they needed to use heart’s blood (enough for a death, not just a wound). So the half-giant swordsman sacrificed himself to free the river. It was unexpected and deeply moving.

  17. Godlike Head Shots

    Dude, Godlike. Yeah, everyone is one headshot away from instant obliteration in that game. I ran a one-shot of the scenario in the book and it was a really rough scenario. A hyper-sniper and a power-nullifier worked together and killed the guy who was being the spotter, who thought he could go Shadowcat on ’em. Rough.

    When playing a gritty WWII super-powered game whose theme is, you are bigger than most people but the war is bigger than you, I could see how that would be a solid mode of play.

  18. Godlike Head Shots

    Dude, Godlike. Yeah, everyone is one headshot away from instant obliteration in that game. I ran a one-shot of the scenario in the book and it was a really rough scenario. A hyper-sniper and a power-nullifier worked together and killed the guy who was being the spotter, who thought he could go Shadowcat on ’em. Rough.

    When playing a gritty WWII super-powered game whose theme is, you are bigger than most people but the war is bigger than you, I could see how that would be a solid mode of play.

  19. Goblin Shiv to the Eye

    I hear ya.

    Sometimes, I wonder if the “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” has to be open to his character actually being the, “When the chips are down, I’m the guy who is going to die trying to pull the group through.” But there are definitely deaths that would be less than satisfying and don’t address what the character is about at all and those are particularly rough.

    Nobody likes taking a goblin shiv to the eye.

  20. Goblin Shiv to the Eye

    I hear ya.

    Sometimes, I wonder if the “When the chips are down, I’m the guy that’ll pull the group through,” has to be open to his character actually being the, “When the chips are down, I’m the guy who is going to die trying to pull the group through.” But there are definitely deaths that would be less than satisfying and don’t address what the character is about at all and those are particularly rough.

    Nobody likes taking a goblin shiv to the eye.

  21. Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

    I just had a character die in a less than appropriate way just recently, and I’ve considered and addressed this issue before.

    I think that it depends on the game you’re running and what you and your players agree to.

    If you’re running a game where dice rolling is out in the open then you need to be playing a brutal game.

    Of course, this can still bite you in the ass. I ran a game of Cyberpunk and expected to take at least a quarter of the party out with the final massive corporate attack. Not one of the party members died because of sheer luck, and also because of some crazy good rolls on the part of the players.

    They were okay with it, and if I had had a chance to continue a future campaign there would definitely have been senseless character deaths.

    However, if you’re running a game like Houses of the Blooded, or L5R where death and sacrifice are far more important to the story then every death should come as a personal stab at the heart strings of every player. A character’s death may come at any moment, and even seem senseless prima facia, but it should represent something deeper. The example I’m thinking of is, of course, the death of the master swordsman in Seven Samurai. He is the definition of bushido honor and glory, killing far more enemies than any one other person in the movie, but a single bullet fired from hiding by a coward destroys the perfection that this man represents. That is the sort of death I aspire to create for every one of my players’ characters.

    In dramatic games I don’t shy away from death, just senseless death, and I will fully embrace it if it is appropriate for the story. So the answer is that it depends on what type of story you are telling.

  22. Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

    I just had a character die in a less than appropriate way just recently, and I’ve considered and addressed this issue before.

    I think that it depends on the game you’re running and what you and your players agree to.

    If you’re running a game where dice rolling is out in the open then you need to be playing a brutal game.

    Of course, this can still bite you in the ass. I ran a game of Cyberpunk and expected to take at least a quarter of the party out with the final massive corporate attack. Not one of the party members died because of sheer luck, and also because of some crazy good rolls on the part of the players.

    They were okay with it, and if I had had a chance to continue a future campaign there would definitely have been senseless character deaths.

    However, if you’re running a game like Houses of the Blooded, or L5R where death and sacrifice are far more important to the story then every death should come as a personal stab at the heart strings of every player. A character’s death may come at any moment, and even seem senseless prima facia, but it should represent something deeper. The example I’m thinking of is, of course, the death of the master swordsman in Seven Samurai. He is the definition of bushido honor and glory, killing far more enemies than any one other person in the movie, but a single bullet fired from hiding by a coward destroys the perfection that this man represents. That is the sort of death I aspire to create for every one of my players’ characters.

    In dramatic games I don’t shy away from death, just senseless death, and I will fully embrace it if it is appropriate for the story. So the answer is that it depends on what type of story you are telling.

  23. Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

    Sadly most games don’t have a separate mechanic for death vs. senseless death. Some games do though:

    MouseGuard. You can’t die in a test, only in a conflict. And when conflicts start, you know if your life is on the line.

    The Shadow of Yesterday: No named character can die unless the players opt to “Bring Down the Pain” which puts both their characters and NPCs lives in danger.

    Dogs in the Vineyard: A dog can always give if fallout would potentially kill him.

    So, I think there are mechanical ways to prevent senseless death, but it might mean limiting the systems you use, or creating hacks for other systems.

    Also, as you pointed out, the master swordsman’s death from the outside appears senseless, like a random crit from a goblin shiv, but in the context of the story it emphasized the impermanence of life and the cruelty of their world. Very much like Cohen brothers movies now that I think about it.

  24. Re: Goblin Shiv to the Eye

    Sadly most games don’t have a separate mechanic for death vs. senseless death. Some games do though:

    MouseGuard. You can’t die in a test, only in a conflict. And when conflicts start, you know if your life is on the line.

    The Shadow of Yesterday: No named character can die unless the players opt to “Bring Down the Pain” which puts both their characters and NPCs lives in danger.

    Dogs in the Vineyard: A dog can always give if fallout would potentially kill him.

    So, I think there are mechanical ways to prevent senseless death, but it might mean limiting the systems you use, or creating hacks for other systems.

    Also, as you pointed out, the master swordsman’s death from the outside appears senseless, like a random crit from a goblin shiv, but in the context of the story it emphasized the impermanence of life and the cruelty of their world. Very much like Cohen brothers movies now that I think about it.

  25. It sounds both form your post here and from the write up on the forums that Shahin went out like a Klingon. He had a good death. Yeah, it sucks to no longer be able to play a character you love, but as you said, his death was incredibly meaningful.

    I don’t think we’re used to seeing stories like this, where the good guy (or just the protagonist) looses, but from your right ups it sounds like the story as a whole (including his death), was tragic, epic and awesome.

    • I am kind of shocked that it has not happened earlier.

      It probably hasn’t because in a group game, there are so many more player resources (artha, skills, helping dice, etc.) that allow folks to save one another. Storn really boxed himself in and decided to take a chance.

      And man, chance effed him good.

    • I am kind of shocked that it has not happened earlier.

      It probably hasn’t because in a group game, there are so many more player resources (artha, skills, helping dice, etc.) that allow folks to save one another. Storn really boxed himself in and decided to take a chance.

      And man, chance effed him good.

  26. It sounds both form your post here and from the write up on the forums that Shahin went out like a Klingon. He had a good death. Yeah, it sucks to no longer be able to play a character you love, but as you said, his death was incredibly meaningful.

    I don’t think we’re used to seeing stories like this, where the good guy (or just the protagonist) looses, but from your right ups it sounds like the story as a whole (including his death), was tragic, epic and awesome.

  27. It sounds both form your post here and from the write up on the forums that Shahin went out like a Klingon. He had a good death. Yeah, it sucks to no longer be able to play a character you love, but as you said, his death was incredibly meaningful.

    I don’t think we’re used to seeing stories like this, where the good guy (or just the protagonist) looses, but from your right ups it sounds like the story as a whole (including his death), was tragic, epic and awesome.

  28. It sounds both form your post here and from the write up on the forums that Shahin went out like a Klingon. He had a good death. Yeah, it sucks to no longer be able to play a character you love, but as you said, his death was incredibly meaningful.

    I don’t think we’re used to seeing stories like this, where the good guy (or just the protagonist) looses, but from your right ups it sounds like the story as a whole (including his death), was tragic, epic and awesome.

  29. Re: Godlike Head Shots

    Yeah, now that you mention it I think we’ve been playing to the “You are larger than life, but the war is larger than you,” vibe pretty closely.

    Personally I love it. It makes the deaths of characters that have manage to survive for a while and flesh out their portrayal really hurt, a real shock. Many of the PC deaths in the game have seemed unfair, cruel fates for the ones that died. But I’ll be damned if it doesn’t say things about the pain of war that I have not experienced in other games.

    We had a character go out a session or two ago. He just got unlucky and was killed by an artillery round. He was a great character, one we all liked, and the player gave him a relatively happy personality. For the other characters, he was like a bright spot in all the horror around them, and then that horror reached out and took him.

    What a gut punch. He didn’t deserve to die, but y’know, in war, deserve’s got nuthin7 to do with it.

  30. Re: Godlike Head Shots

    Yeah, now that you mention it I think we’ve been playing to the “You are larger than life, but the war is larger than you,” vibe pretty closely.

    Personally I love it. It makes the deaths of characters that have manage to survive for a while and flesh out their portrayal really hurt, a real shock. Many of the PC deaths in the game have seemed unfair, cruel fates for the ones that died. But I’ll be damned if it doesn’t say things about the pain of war that I have not experienced in other games.

    We had a character go out a session or two ago. He just got unlucky and was killed by an artillery round. He was a great character, one we all liked, and the player gave him a relatively happy personality. For the other characters, he was like a bright spot in all the horror around them, and then that horror reached out and took him.

    What a gut punch. He didn’t deserve to die, but y’know, in war, deserve’s got nuthin7 to do with it.

  31. I am kind of shocked that it has not happened earlier.

    It probably hasn’t because in a group game, there are so many more player resources (artha, skills, helping dice, etc.) that allow folks to save one another. Storn really boxed himself in and decided to take a chance.

    And man, chance effed him good.

  32. I am kind of shocked that it has not happened earlier.

    It probably hasn’t because in a group game, there are so many more player resources (artha, skills, helping dice, etc.) that allow folks to save one another. Storn really boxed himself in and decided to take a chance.

    And man, chance effed him good.

  33. Re: Godlike Head Shots

    I also want to add, that somehow, I think the group has been playing their characters so that rather than having a “satisfying death” narratively speaking (because there really isn’t a satisfying death in a gritty war story), they’re playing their characters so that they have a satisfying /life/, because that’s what needs to be remembered.

    Makes it all very emotional, even profound, and by god, these are some satisfying game sessions we’re having.

  34. Re: Godlike Head Shots

    I also want to add, that somehow, I think the group has been playing their characters so that rather than having a “satisfying death” narratively speaking (because there really isn’t a satisfying death in a gritty war story), they’re playing their characters so that they have a satisfying /life/, because that’s what needs to be remembered.

    Makes it all very emotional, even profound, and by god, these are some satisfying game sessions we’re having.

  35. Re: Godlike Head Shots

    Man, fantastic.

    Those paragraphs in your posts above should be strung together and put in an AP thread. I am sure the writers of Godlike would love to read about people really getting it and getting into it.

  36. Re: Godlike Head Shots

    Man, fantastic.

    Those paragraphs in your posts above should be strung together and put in an AP thread. I am sure the writers of Godlike would love to read about people really getting it and getting into it.

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