When faced with a bad review.

Graciously thank the reviewer for taking the time to read and review your work.

Thank you, Malcolm.

Dictionary of Mu marked the final degeneration from “trend” to “affectation” and finally, “masturbation.” By and large, strangeness for strangeness’ sake (mixed with pulp pastiche as part of a male-nerd thing) is getting monotonous. “It has a noble title as long as your arm! Mighty thews. Steam power. Spider vaginas!” Yeah, just shut up.

EDIT: Spider vaginas? There are no spider vaginas. Witch-kingly cock…YES. Arachnida cake? No.

Quote added to the IPR site? Why, yes, it is.

EDIT II: Discussion is closed. Good night, internet.

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193 thoughts on “When faced with a bad review.

    • I own Houses of the Blooded. It’s not really the same thing. It lacks some specific markers like nihilistic masculinity and consciously elaborate imagery. HotB’s setting is quite straightforward and concentrates on redefined fundamentals. Creatures are all Ork, for instance.

      Is it a good game? I’ll find out when I run it, but I’m running another game right now. But even if it was good, and did fit in that category, it wouldn’t really change anything.

    • I own Houses of the Blooded. It’s not really the same thing. It lacks some specific markers like nihilistic masculinity and consciously elaborate imagery. HotB’s setting is quite straightforward and concentrates on redefined fundamentals. Creatures are all Ork, for instance.

      Is it a good game? I’ll find out when I run it, but I’m running another game right now. But even if it was good, and did fit in that category, it wouldn’t really change anything.

    • Haha, I did raise an eyebrow at that. I wouldn’t put those three on the same shelf together. If I left the room for a few minutes, I’d come back and the other two books would be gone and Mu would be suspiciously larger.

    • Haha, I did raise an eyebrow at that. I wouldn’t put those three on the same shelf together. If I left the room for a few minutes, I’d come back and the other two books would be gone and Mu would be suspiciously larger.

  1. Man, I dunno. That kind of snobbery just seems so exhausting. I’d rather be having fun playing Mu than sneering over the rim of my wine glass.

    -Matt

  2. Man, I dunno. That kind of snobbery just seems so exhausting. I’d rather be having fun playing Mu than sneering over the rim of my wine glass.

    -Matt

  3. Man, I dunno. That kind of snobbery just seems so exhausting. I’d rather be having fun playing Mu than sneering over the rim of my wine glass.

    -Matt

  4. Man, I dunno. That kind of snobbery just seems so exhausting. I’d rather be having fun playing Mu than sneering over the rim of my wine glass.

    -Matt

  5. I think Geist (which I worked on) is the last decent implementation to be had before it’s time to say goodbye to this one.

    Hahahaha. CREDIBILITY.

      • Dictionary of Mu would not be third on my list of overly inclusive kitchen-sink fantasy settings, especially not if the first two items on my list were Exalted and Eberron. Given the much larger distribution of every other game mentioned in the post, I have to wonder whether he wrote “Dictionary of Mu” accidentially, while meaning to write, I dunno, virtually anything else.

      • Dictionary of Mu would not be third on my list of overly inclusive kitchen-sink fantasy settings, especially not if the first two items on my list were Exalted and Eberron. Given the much larger distribution of every other game mentioned in the post, I have to wonder whether he wrote “Dictionary of Mu” accidentially, while meaning to write, I dunno, virtually anything else.

    • Poor credibility would be if I didn’t say I worked on it. I do honestly believe that Geist spins the concept in a way that Mummy and Changeling: The Dreaming didn’t, but you’ll have to judge for yourself when it comes out.

      • “The last great implementation of an idea is this game I worked on” is not a credible statement unless you’ve established yourself as someone who can critique their own works in an as-objective-as-possible way.

        If you’d criticized your own work as much as you’d complimented it in this essay, I would have found you more credible. As it was, you took shots at other people’s games while reserving a tidy amount of praise for yourself.

        • I’m not really responsible for the concepts in Geist that I think merit another toss at the idea. That’s Ethan Skemp. Plus, I have worked on Mage: The Ascension, which I specifically called out as doing Lovecraft cheesily.

          • See, I didn’t know you worked on Mage, and you didn’t really call attention to it like you did Geist. But then I’m not a regular reader of your stuff, so maybe that’s some assumed context.

            Also you were a pretty big jerk to me on this old internet one time, so that colors my perception of the essay too.

            • I didn’t point out my relationship with Mage: The Ascension because it takes up such a huge part of my CV and the game’s been done with for a few years. It’s a good point though, given that as the new blog’s readership expands I’ll have to explain these things more.

            • I didn’t point out my relationship with Mage: The Ascension because it takes up such a huge part of my CV and the game’s been done with for a few years. It’s a good point though, given that as the new blog’s readership expands I’ll have to explain these things more.

          • See, I didn’t know you worked on Mage, and you didn’t really call attention to it like you did Geist. But then I’m not a regular reader of your stuff, so maybe that’s some assumed context.

            Also you were a pretty big jerk to me on this old internet one time, so that colors my perception of the essay too.

        • I’m not really responsible for the concepts in Geist that I think merit another toss at the idea. That’s Ethan Skemp. Plus, I have worked on Mage: The Ascension, which I specifically called out as doing Lovecraft cheesily.

      • “The last great implementation of an idea is this game I worked on” is not a credible statement unless you’ve established yourself as someone who can critique their own works in an as-objective-as-possible way.

        If you’d criticized your own work as much as you’d complimented it in this essay, I would have found you more credible. As it was, you took shots at other people’s games while reserving a tidy amount of praise for yourself.

    • Poor credibility would be if I didn’t say I worked on it. I do honestly believe that Geist spins the concept in a way that Mummy and Changeling: The Dreaming didn’t, but you’ll have to judge for yourself when it comes out.

  6. I think Geist (which I worked on) is the last decent implementation to be had before it’s time to say goodbye to this one.

    Hahahaha. CREDIBILITY.

  7. I think Geist (which I worked on) is the last decent implementation to be had before it’s time to say goodbye to this one.

    Hahahaha. CREDIBILITY.

  8. I think Geist (which I worked on) is the last decent implementation to be had before it’s time to say goodbye to this one.

    Hahahaha. CREDIBILITY.

  9. Haha, I did raise an eyebrow at that. I wouldn’t put those three on the same shelf together. If I left the room for a few minutes, I’d come back and the other two books would be gone and Mu would be suspiciously larger.

  10. Haha, I did raise an eyebrow at that. I wouldn’t put those three on the same shelf together. If I left the room for a few minutes, I’d come back and the other two books would be gone and Mu would be suspiciously larger.

  11. Dictionary of Mu would not be third on my list of overly inclusive kitchen-sink fantasy settings, especially not if the first two items on my list were Exalted and Eberron. Given the much larger distribution of every other game mentioned in the post, I have to wonder whether he wrote “Dictionary of Mu” accidentially, while meaning to write, I dunno, virtually anything else.

  12. Dictionary of Mu would not be third on my list of overly inclusive kitchen-sink fantasy settings, especially not if the first two items on my list were Exalted and Eberron. Given the much larger distribution of every other game mentioned in the post, I have to wonder whether he wrote “Dictionary of Mu” accidentially, while meaning to write, I dunno, virtually anything else.

  13. The process of putting a piece of creative effort into the public square requires a certain degree of bravery.

    The profession of criticizing the creative efforts of others requires a certain degree of cowardice.

      • “Let the critic go through the creative process and make something of his own so he can speak first-hand about the process itself and lend insight to the reader instead of finding clever and cruel ways to say ‘I didn’t like it’.”

        How’s that?

        • 1. In this case the critic had released creative work before.

          2. Criticism is a result of creative-process.

          3. I have no problems with criticisms, so long that they are well-thought and explained.

          4. Critics give opinions, they don’t have to be “I don’t like it”, it can be “I like it”. And if you’re willing to accept one from the critic, you should also accept the other.

          5. So, you’re not acting as a political critic on your blog, and criticize people for their beliefs?

          • 1. I know that.

            2. No, it is not.

            3. Ditto.

            4. That’s exactly right. I don’t really give a shit if anyone likes or dislikes my game. I didn’t make it for them; I made it for me and I’m the only person I’m interested in making happy with my own work. (As a side note, I’m never fully satisfied with my own work.)

            5. Yes, I criticize people for their beliefs. Especially when those beliefs are “You’re a lesser person than me,” “You don’t deserve the same rights I do,” and “I deserve special rights.” And Big Time Especially when they claim their beliefs come from the mind of an invisible friend nobody can prove.

            But you’re comparing apples and oranges. I’m talking about “reviews.” Professional critics like Ebert and the like. Folks who make a living telling you what to watch and read.

            • So, let’s look at 4, which is the most relevant point.

              Why care about critics, and their ‘cowardice’? If their opinion doesn’t matter to you, why not let them go on with their endeavours?

              • Because Roger Ebert’s thumb is the make-break of the film industry. And because he encourages laziness. “Don’t go see the film, listen to me. I’ll tell you whether or not you should see it.”

                And because the “professionalism” of most game critics is non-existent. It is clearly evident most of them don’t even read the game. Some even say that playing the game corrupts their opinion of it. They won’t play the game–just read it. That’s like basing a movie review on the trailer without ever seeing the actual movie.

                I remember people reviewing 7th Sea: first, they’d call it “7th Seas” or “7 Seas” or something inane like that. And I’d reply, “Hey buddy? Read the cover much?” Then, they’d say it was a Renaissance Era game, when the first five pages say “RESTORATION AGE” all over them and even talk about the differences between a Renaissance Era game and a Restoration Era game. Again: clearly evident they had no idea what the game was about. And the reviews always said, “I haven’t actually played this, but the system looks like it doesn’t work.” How the hell would you know if the system works or not if you haven’t played it???

                Assholes.

                Anyway, I’ve always viewed the role of the reviewer as something educational. You are supposed to educate the reader to what the game is so they can make up their own mind whether or not they want to play it.

                Simply writing something clever and cutting about a game is easy. It’s pathetic how easy it is. Try educating your reader about the game. That’s a challenge.

              • I don’t think it’s lazy to not want to see every single shitty film that ever gets released.

                It sounds to me like you dealt with some buttholes that were critics, so now to you all critics are buttholes.

                I’ll keep what you said about educating in mind, though. That’s a fair comment.

              • I don’t think it’s lazy to not want to see every single shitty film that ever gets released.

                It sounds to me like you dealt with some buttholes that were critics, so now to you all critics are buttholes.

                I’ll keep what you said about educating in mind, though. That’s a fair comment.

              • Because Roger Ebert’s thumb is the make-break of the film industry. And because he encourages laziness. “Don’t go see the film, listen to me. I’ll tell you whether or not you should see it.”

                And because the “professionalism” of most game critics is non-existent. It is clearly evident most of them don’t even read the game. Some even say that playing the game corrupts their opinion of it. They won’t play the game–just read it. That’s like basing a movie review on the trailer without ever seeing the actual movie.

                I remember people reviewing 7th Sea: first, they’d call it “7th Seas” or “7 Seas” or something inane like that. And I’d reply, “Hey buddy? Read the cover much?” Then, they’d say it was a Renaissance Era game, when the first five pages say “RESTORATION AGE” all over them and even talk about the differences between a Renaissance Era game and a Restoration Era game. Again: clearly evident they had no idea what the game was about. And the reviews always said, “I haven’t actually played this, but the system looks like it doesn’t work.” How the hell would you know if the system works or not if you haven’t played it???

                Assholes.

                Anyway, I’ve always viewed the role of the reviewer as something educational. You are supposed to educate the reader to what the game is so they can make up their own mind whether or not they want to play it.

                Simply writing something clever and cutting about a game is easy. It’s pathetic how easy it is. Try educating your reader about the game. That’s a challenge.

            • So, let’s look at 4, which is the most relevant point.

              Why care about critics, and their ‘cowardice’? If their opinion doesn’t matter to you, why not let them go on with their endeavours?

          • 1. I know that.

            2. No, it is not.

            3. Ditto.

            4. That’s exactly right. I don’t really give a shit if anyone likes or dislikes my game. I didn’t make it for them; I made it for me and I’m the only person I’m interested in making happy with my own work. (As a side note, I’m never fully satisfied with my own work.)

            5. Yes, I criticize people for their beliefs. Especially when those beliefs are “You’re a lesser person than me,” “You don’t deserve the same rights I do,” and “I deserve special rights.” And Big Time Especially when they claim their beliefs come from the mind of an invisible friend nobody can prove.

            But you’re comparing apples and oranges. I’m talking about “reviews.” Professional critics like Ebert and the like. Folks who make a living telling you what to watch and read.

        • 1. In this case the critic had released creative work before.

          2. Criticism is a result of creative-process.

          3. I have no problems with criticisms, so long that they are well-thought and explained.

          4. Critics give opinions, they don’t have to be “I don’t like it”, it can be “I like it”. And if you’re willing to accept one from the critic, you should also accept the other.

          5. So, you’re not acting as a political critic on your blog, and criticize people for their beliefs?

      • “Let the critic go through the creative process and make something of his own so he can speak first-hand about the process itself and lend insight to the reader instead of finding clever and cruel ways to say ‘I didn’t like it’.”

        How’s that?

  14. The process of putting a piece of creative effort into the public square requires a certain degree of bravery.

    The profession of criticizing the creative efforts of others requires a certain degree of cowardice.

  15. The process of putting a piece of creative effort into the public square requires a certain degree of bravery.

    The profession of criticizing the creative efforts of others requires a certain degree of cowardice.

  16. The process of putting a piece of creative effort into the public square requires a certain degree of bravery.

    The profession of criticizing the creative efforts of others requires a certain degree of cowardice.

      • I mean, I never read an actual L5R book, but I have the DnD3E Oriental Adventures book, which has the L5R license and uses it as the default setting.

        Matt

      • I mean, I never read an actual L5R book, but I have the DnD3E Oriental Adventures book, which has the L5R license and uses it as the default setting.

        Matt

    • Its mostly Japan, but it also has heavy doses of China in it. And some Korea, for that matter. Its really kinda an “Asian smörgåsbord” game, with the more katanas than not because katanas are the coolest.

    • Its mostly Japan, but it also has heavy doses of China in it. And some Korea, for that matter. Its really kinda an “Asian smörgåsbord” game, with the more katanas than not because katanas are the coolest.

    • That’s why I said “Chinese cultural sphere,” not “China.” I’m talking about regions where the relationships to Chinese cultural traditions can be (very roughly) seen as similar to the relationships much of Europe has with Rome. That includes Japan, Korea, the Ryukyu Kingdom and other countries/areas in much the same way that everywhere from France to Romania come from the Roman sphere — distinct, but sharing certain influences.

    • That’s why I said “Chinese cultural sphere,” not “China.” I’m talking about regions where the relationships to Chinese cultural traditions can be (very roughly) seen as similar to the relationships much of Europe has with Rome. That includes Japan, Korea, the Ryukyu Kingdom and other countries/areas in much the same way that everywhere from France to Romania come from the Roman sphere — distinct, but sharing certain influences.

  17. I mean, I never read an actual L5R book, but I have the DnD3E Oriental Adventures book, which has the L5R license and uses it as the default setting.

    Matt

  18. I mean, I never read an actual L5R book, but I have the DnD3E Oriental Adventures book, which has the L5R license and uses it as the default setting.

    Matt

  19. Its mostly Japan, but it also has heavy doses of China in it. And some Korea, for that matter. Its really kinda an “Asian smörgåsbord” game, with the more katanas than not because katanas are the coolest.

  20. Its mostly Japan, but it also has heavy doses of China in it. And some Korea, for that matter. Its really kinda an “Asian smörgåsbord” game, with the more katanas than not because katanas are the coolest.

  21. [Applauds]

    You, sir, have got some seriously high levels of Buddha-nature. Good on you for subverting the internet bullsh*t and making it your own.

  22. [Applauds]

    You, sir, have got some seriously high levels of Buddha-nature. Good on you for subverting the internet bullsh*t and making it your own.

  23. [Applauds]

    You, sir, have got some seriously high levels of Buddha-nature. Good on you for subverting the internet bullsh*t and making it your own.

  24. [Applauds]

    You, sir, have got some seriously high levels of Buddha-nature. Good on you for subverting the internet bullsh*t and making it your own.

  25. I’m kinda surprised someone would make a list of five played-out RPG things without mentioning the “modern/near-future + elves and magic” trope. I guess that shows how subjective the label can be.

    — Alex

    • I wanted to keep the article at a readable length. That’s a good point though. In Aeternal Legends’ case I felt that Stew Wilson’s exploration of the classic heroic fantasy structure as an explicitly occult/spiritual journey was what made it worthwhile. But elves and orcs and such are definite cliches, though they’re so longstanding at this point that it doesn’t reveal much to say it.

      • I think it is interesting that D&D fantasy got so big that even games that left the pseudo-medieval D&D setting still kept so many D&D-fantasy elements. The “elves and magic in a modern setting” thing is particularly revealing just because it’s much more more obvious than “D&D-style group dynamics in a modern setting”, for example.

        — Alex

      • I think it is interesting that D&D fantasy got so big that even games that left the pseudo-medieval D&D setting still kept so many D&D-fantasy elements. The “elves and magic in a modern setting” thing is particularly revealing just because it’s much more more obvious than “D&D-style group dynamics in a modern setting”, for example.

        — Alex

    • I wanted to keep the article at a readable length. That’s a good point though. In Aeternal Legends’ case I felt that Stew Wilson’s exploration of the classic heroic fantasy structure as an explicitly occult/spiritual journey was what made it worthwhile. But elves and orcs and such are definite cliches, though they’re so longstanding at this point that it doesn’t reveal much to say it.

  26. I’m kinda surprised someone would make a list of five played-out RPG things without mentioning the “modern/near-future + elves and magic” trope. I guess that shows how subjective the label can be.

    — Alex

  27. I’m kinda surprised someone would make a list of five played-out RPG things without mentioning the “modern/near-future + elves and magic” trope. I guess that shows how subjective the label can be.

    — Alex

  28. I’m kinda surprised someone would make a list of five played-out RPG things without mentioning the “modern/near-future + elves and magic” trope. I guess that shows how subjective the label can be.

    — Alex

  29. “Let the critic go through the creative process and make something of his own so he can speak first-hand about the process itself and lend insight to the reader instead of finding clever and cruel ways to say ‘I didn’t like it’.”

    How’s that?

  30. “Let the critic go through the creative process and make something of his own so he can speak first-hand about the process itself and lend insight to the reader instead of finding clever and cruel ways to say ‘I didn’t like it’.”

    How’s that?

  31. 1. In this case the critic had released creative work before.

    2. Criticism is a result of creative-process.

    3. I have no problems with criticisms, so long that they are well-thought and explained.

    4. Critics give opinions, they don’t have to be “I don’t like it”, it can be “I like it”. And if you’re willing to accept one from the critic, you should also accept the other.

    5. So, you’re not acting as a political critic on your blog, and criticize people for their beliefs?

  32. 1. In this case the critic had released creative work before.

    2. Criticism is a result of creative-process.

    3. I have no problems with criticisms, so long that they are well-thought and explained.

    4. Critics give opinions, they don’t have to be “I don’t like it”, it can be “I like it”. And if you’re willing to accept one from the critic, you should also accept the other.

    5. So, you’re not acting as a political critic on your blog, and criticize people for their beliefs?

  33. 1. I know that.

    2. No, it is not.

    3. Ditto.

    4. That’s exactly right. I don’t really give a shit if anyone likes or dislikes my game. I didn’t make it for them; I made it for me and I’m the only person I’m interested in making happy with my own work. (As a side note, I’m never fully satisfied with my own work.)

    5. Yes, I criticize people for their beliefs. Especially when those beliefs are “You’re a lesser person than me,” “You don’t deserve the same rights I do,” and “I deserve special rights.” And Big Time Especially when they claim their beliefs come from the mind of an invisible friend nobody can prove.

    But you’re comparing apples and oranges. I’m talking about “reviews.” Professional critics like Ebert and the like. Folks who make a living telling you what to watch and read.

  34. 1. I know that.

    2. No, it is not.

    3. Ditto.

    4. That’s exactly right. I don’t really give a shit if anyone likes or dislikes my game. I didn’t make it for them; I made it for me and I’m the only person I’m interested in making happy with my own work. (As a side note, I’m never fully satisfied with my own work.)

    5. Yes, I criticize people for their beliefs. Especially when those beliefs are “You’re a lesser person than me,” “You don’t deserve the same rights I do,” and “I deserve special rights.” And Big Time Especially when they claim their beliefs come from the mind of an invisible friend nobody can prove.

    But you’re comparing apples and oranges. I’m talking about “reviews.” Professional critics like Ebert and the like. Folks who make a living telling you what to watch and read.

  35. So, let’s look at 4, which is the most relevant point.

    Why care about critics, and their ‘cowardice’? If their opinion doesn’t matter to you, why not let them go on with their endeavours?

  36. So, let’s look at 4, which is the most relevant point.

    Why care about critics, and their ‘cowardice’? If their opinion doesn’t matter to you, why not let them go on with their endeavours?

  37. Because Roger Ebert’s thumb is the make-break of the film industry. And because he encourages laziness. “Don’t go see the film, listen to me. I’ll tell you whether or not you should see it.”

    And because the “professionalism” of most game critics is non-existent. It is clearly evident most of them don’t even read the game. Some even say that playing the game corrupts their opinion of it. They won’t play the game–just read it. That’s like basing a movie review on the trailer without ever seeing the actual movie.

    I remember people reviewing 7th Sea: first, they’d call it “7th Seas” or “7 Seas” or something inane like that. And I’d reply, “Hey buddy? Read the cover much?” Then, they’d say it was a Renaissance Era game, when the first five pages say “RESTORATION AGE” all over them and even talk about the differences between a Renaissance Era game and a Restoration Era game. Again: clearly evident they had no idea what the game was about. And the reviews always said, “I haven’t actually played this, but the system looks like it doesn’t work.” How the hell would you know if the system works or not if you haven’t played it???

    Assholes.

    Anyway, I’ve always viewed the role of the reviewer as something educational. You are supposed to educate the reader to what the game is so they can make up their own mind whether or not they want to play it.

    Simply writing something clever and cutting about a game is easy. It’s pathetic how easy it is. Try educating your reader about the game. That’s a challenge.

  38. Because Roger Ebert’s thumb is the make-break of the film industry. And because he encourages laziness. “Don’t go see the film, listen to me. I’ll tell you whether or not you should see it.”

    And because the “professionalism” of most game critics is non-existent. It is clearly evident most of them don’t even read the game. Some even say that playing the game corrupts their opinion of it. They won’t play the game–just read it. That’s like basing a movie review on the trailer without ever seeing the actual movie.

    I remember people reviewing 7th Sea: first, they’d call it “7th Seas” or “7 Seas” or something inane like that. And I’d reply, “Hey buddy? Read the cover much?” Then, they’d say it was a Renaissance Era game, when the first five pages say “RESTORATION AGE” all over them and even talk about the differences between a Renaissance Era game and a Restoration Era game. Again: clearly evident they had no idea what the game was about. And the reviews always said, “I haven’t actually played this, but the system looks like it doesn’t work.” How the hell would you know if the system works or not if you haven’t played it???

    Assholes.

    Anyway, I’ve always viewed the role of the reviewer as something educational. You are supposed to educate the reader to what the game is so they can make up their own mind whether or not they want to play it.

    Simply writing something clever and cutting about a game is easy. It’s pathetic how easy it is. Try educating your reader about the game. That’s a challenge.

  39. I don’t get something in that review – in addition to bashing Mu, he seems to lambast books he worked on? I mean, he spends time bashing WoD stuff while at the same time noting he worked on it? Is that… sensible?

  40. I don’t get something in that review – in addition to bashing Mu, he seems to lambast books he worked on? I mean, he spends time bashing WoD stuff while at the same time noting he worked on it? Is that… sensible?

  41. I don’t get something in that review – in addition to bashing Mu, he seems to lambast books he worked on? I mean, he spends time bashing WoD stuff while at the same time noting he worked on it? Is that… sensible?

  42. I don’t get something in that review – in addition to bashing Mu, he seems to lambast books he worked on? I mean, he spends time bashing WoD stuff while at the same time noting he worked on it? Is that… sensible?

  43. 1) It wasn’t a review of your book. It was a review of an overdone trend that I feel Dictionary of Mu is a part of, and should be taken in that context.

    2) You should have asked permission before using my content to promote your book. Feel free use the first sentence in the excerpt you posted, since it’s about your book. The subsequent sentences don’t really have to do with your book in particular, which is why they don’t represent Dictionary of Mu‘s particular content.

  44. 1) It wasn’t a review of your book. It was a review of an overdone trend that I feel Dictionary of Mu is a part of, and should be taken in that context.

    2) You should have asked permission before using my content to promote your book. Feel free use the first sentence in the excerpt you posted, since it’s about your book. The subsequent sentences don’t really have to do with your book in particular, which is why they don’t represent Dictionary of Mu‘s particular content.

  45. 1) It wasn’t a review of your book. It was a review of an overdone trend that I feel Dictionary of Mu is a part of, and should be taken in that context.

    2) You should have asked permission before using my content to promote your book. Feel free use the first sentence in the excerpt you posted, since it’s about your book. The subsequent sentences don’t really have to do with your book in particular, which is why they don’t represent Dictionary of Mu‘s particular content.

  46. 1) It wasn’t a review of your book. It was a review of an overdone trend that I feel Dictionary of Mu is a part of, and should be taken in that context.

    2) You should have asked permission before using my content to promote your book. Feel free use the first sentence in the excerpt you posted, since it’s about your book. The subsequent sentences don’t really have to do with your book in particular, which is why they don’t represent Dictionary of Mu‘s particular content.

  47. That’s why I said “Chinese cultural sphere,” not “China.” I’m talking about regions where the relationships to Chinese cultural traditions can be (very roughly) seen as similar to the relationships much of Europe has with Rome. That includes Japan, Korea, the Ryukyu Kingdom and other countries/areas in much the same way that everywhere from France to Romania come from the Roman sphere — distinct, but sharing certain influences.

  48. That’s why I said “Chinese cultural sphere,” not “China.” I’m talking about regions where the relationships to Chinese cultural traditions can be (very roughly) seen as similar to the relationships much of Europe has with Rome. That includes Japan, Korea, the Ryukyu Kingdom and other countries/areas in much the same way that everywhere from France to Romania come from the Roman sphere — distinct, but sharing certain influences.

  49. Poor credibility would be if I didn’t say I worked on it. I do honestly believe that Geist spins the concept in a way that Mummy and Changeling: The Dreaming didn’t, but you’ll have to judge for yourself when it comes out.

  50. Poor credibility would be if I didn’t say I worked on it. I do honestly believe that Geist spins the concept in a way that Mummy and Changeling: The Dreaming didn’t, but you’ll have to judge for yourself when it comes out.

  51. “The last great implementation of an idea is this game I worked on” is not a credible statement unless you’ve established yourself as someone who can critique their own works in an as-objective-as-possible way.

    If you’d criticized your own work as much as you’d complimented it in this essay, I would have found you more credible. As it was, you took shots at other people’s games while reserving a tidy amount of praise for yourself.

  52. “The last great implementation of an idea is this game I worked on” is not a credible statement unless you’ve established yourself as someone who can critique their own works in an as-objective-as-possible way.

    If you’d criticized your own work as much as you’d complimented it in this essay, I would have found you more credible. As it was, you took shots at other people’s games while reserving a tidy amount of praise for yourself.

  53. I own Houses of the Blooded. It’s not really the same thing. It lacks some specific markers like nihilistic masculinity and consciously elaborate imagery. HotB’s setting is quite straightforward and concentrates on redefined fundamentals. Creatures are all Ork, for instance.

    Is it a good game? I’ll find out when I run it, but I’m running another game right now. But even if it was good, and did fit in that category, it wouldn’t really change anything.

  54. I own Houses of the Blooded. It’s not really the same thing. It lacks some specific markers like nihilistic masculinity and consciously elaborate imagery. HotB’s setting is quite straightforward and concentrates on redefined fundamentals. Creatures are all Ork, for instance.

    Is it a good game? I’ll find out when I run it, but I’m running another game right now. But even if it was good, and did fit in that category, it wouldn’t really change anything.

  55. I don’t think it’s lazy to not want to see every single shitty film that ever gets released.

    It sounds to me like you dealt with some buttholes that were critics, so now to you all critics are buttholes.

    I’ll keep what you said about educating in mind, though. That’s a fair comment.

  56. I don’t think it’s lazy to not want to see every single shitty film that ever gets released.

    It sounds to me like you dealt with some buttholes that were critics, so now to you all critics are buttholes.

    I’ll keep what you said about educating in mind, though. That’s a fair comment.

  57. I’m not really responsible for the concepts in Geist that I think merit another toss at the idea. That’s Ethan Skemp. Plus, I have worked on Mage: The Ascension, which I specifically called out as doing Lovecraft cheesily.

  58. I’m not really responsible for the concepts in Geist that I think merit another toss at the idea. That’s Ethan Skemp. Plus, I have worked on Mage: The Ascension, which I specifically called out as doing Lovecraft cheesily.

  59. See, I didn’t know you worked on Mage, and you didn’t really call attention to it like you did Geist. But then I’m not a regular reader of your stuff, so maybe that’s some assumed context.

    Also you were a pretty big jerk to me on this old internet one time, so that colors my perception of the essay too.

  60. See, I didn’t know you worked on Mage, and you didn’t really call attention to it like you did Geist. But then I’m not a regular reader of your stuff, so maybe that’s some assumed context.

    Also you were a pretty big jerk to me on this old internet one time, so that colors my perception of the essay too.

  61. I wanted to keep the article at a readable length. That’s a good point though. In Aeternal Legends’ case I felt that Stew Wilson’s exploration of the classic heroic fantasy structure as an explicitly occult/spiritual journey was what made it worthwhile. But elves and orcs and such are definite cliches, though they’re so longstanding at this point that it doesn’t reveal much to say it.

  62. I wanted to keep the article at a readable length. That’s a good point though. In Aeternal Legends’ case I felt that Stew Wilson’s exploration of the classic heroic fantasy structure as an explicitly occult/spiritual journey was what made it worthwhile. But elves and orcs and such are definite cliches, though they’re so longstanding at this point that it doesn’t reveal much to say it.

  63. I didn’t point out my relationship with Mage: The Ascension because it takes up such a huge part of my CV and the game’s been done with for a few years. It’s a good point though, given that as the new blog’s readership expands I’ll have to explain these things more.

  64. I didn’t point out my relationship with Mage: The Ascension because it takes up such a huge part of my CV and the game’s been done with for a few years. It’s a good point though, given that as the new blog’s readership expands I’ll have to explain these things more.

  65. I think it is interesting that D&D fantasy got so big that even games that left the pseudo-medieval D&D setting still kept so many D&D-fantasy elements. The “elves and magic in a modern setting” thing is particularly revealing just because it’s much more more obvious than “D&D-style group dynamics in a modern setting”, for example.

    — Alex

  66. I think it is interesting that D&D fantasy got so big that even games that left the pseudo-medieval D&D setting still kept so many D&D-fantasy elements. The “elves and magic in a modern setting” thing is particularly revealing just because it’s much more more obvious than “D&D-style group dynamics in a modern setting”, for example.

    — Alex

  67. With or without that second sentence, that level of quotation is still fair use. If you aren’t comfortable being taken out of context, don’t publish. It’s a hazard of the territory, dude.

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