Just about Friday already

Tomorrow is my last day of work for a week. Janaki and I are heading out west for our vacation. I cannot wait.

Reading: Finally started Desolation Road. I will likely dig into it during the travels this weekend.

Planning: Laundry and packing.

Wearing: My favorite pair of maroon sweatpants.

Writing: Yeah, wrote some on a game setting that is not cooked yet but I want to play it anyway.

And you?

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52 thoughts on “Just about Friday already

  1. Reading: Read Ender’s Shadow, reading Shadow of the Hegemon, also have “Perdido Street Station” to read.

    Planning: Job transition. Aiiiieeeeee!

    Wearing: bed time clothes

    Writing: Resignation letters, acceptance letters, proposals, etc.

  2. Reading: Read Ender’s Shadow, reading Shadow of the Hegemon, also have “Perdido Street Station” to read.

    Planning: Job transition. Aiiiieeeeee!

    Wearing: bed time clothes

    Writing: Resignation letters, acceptance letters, proposals, etc.

  3. Reading: Read Ender’s Shadow, reading Shadow of the Hegemon, also have “Perdido Street Station” to read.

    Planning: Job transition. Aiiiieeeeee!

    Wearing: bed time clothes

    Writing: Resignation letters, acceptance letters, proposals, etc.

  4. Reading: Read Ender’s Shadow, reading Shadow of the Hegemon, also have “Perdido Street Station” to read.

    Planning: Job transition. Aiiiieeeeee!

    Wearing: bed time clothes

    Writing: Resignation letters, acceptance letters, proposals, etc.

  5. Reading: Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone. A mid-Victorian murder mystery. It’s great.

    Planning: Laying out A Taste For Murder.

    Wearing: My loose shorts and T-shirt that says “U. S. A.”

    Writing: The psychology project about whether people move their hands when they speak.

  6. Reading: Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone. A mid-Victorian murder mystery. It’s great.

    Planning: Laying out A Taste For Murder.

    Wearing: My loose shorts and T-shirt that says “U. S. A.”

    Writing: The psychology project about whether people move their hands when they speak.

  7. Reading: Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone. A mid-Victorian murder mystery. It’s great.

    Planning: Laying out A Taste For Murder.

    Wearing: My loose shorts and T-shirt that says “U. S. A.”

    Writing: The psychology project about whether people move their hands when they speak.

  8. Reading: Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone. A mid-Victorian murder mystery. It’s great.

    Planning: Laying out A Taste For Murder.

    Wearing: My loose shorts and T-shirt that says “U. S. A.”

    Writing: The psychology project about whether people move their hands when they speak.

  9. Reading: Just finished listening to the audiobook of Around the World in 80 Days. It was better than I remember from when I read it 20+ years ago.

    Planning: D&D game on Sunday. Maybe a trip to the movies (or two: District 9 and Ponyo beckon!)

    Wearing: Tan shirt and tan pants. Blandman strikes again.

    Writing: Making scattered notes on 3 different games. None of which has really sparked yet. Wastin’ time.

  10. Reading: Just finished listening to the audiobook of Around the World in 80 Days. It was better than I remember from when I read it 20+ years ago.

    Planning: D&D game on Sunday. Maybe a trip to the movies (or two: District 9 and Ponyo beckon!)

    Wearing: Tan shirt and tan pants. Blandman strikes again.

    Writing: Making scattered notes on 3 different games. None of which has really sparked yet. Wastin’ time.

  11. Reading: Just finished listening to the audiobook of Around the World in 80 Days. It was better than I remember from when I read it 20+ years ago.

    Planning: D&D game on Sunday. Maybe a trip to the movies (or two: District 9 and Ponyo beckon!)

    Wearing: Tan shirt and tan pants. Blandman strikes again.

    Writing: Making scattered notes on 3 different games. None of which has really sparked yet. Wastin’ time.

  12. Reading: Just finished listening to the audiobook of Around the World in 80 Days. It was better than I remember from when I read it 20+ years ago.

    Planning: D&D game on Sunday. Maybe a trip to the movies (or two: District 9 and Ponyo beckon!)

    Wearing: Tan shirt and tan pants. Blandman strikes again.

    Writing: Making scattered notes on 3 different games. None of which has really sparked yet. Wastin’ time.

  13. About hands: My fencing maestro once gave an interview to a local tv station, in English and then in Spanish.

    When speaking English, he stood in what I was taught by my 3rd grade teacher as the at-ease position, which meant that his hands were behind his back, not moving.

    When speaking Spanish, his hands were in front, constantly in motion.

  14. About hands: My fencing maestro once gave an interview to a local tv station, in English and then in Spanish.

    When speaking English, he stood in what I was taught by my 3rd grade teacher as the at-ease position, which meant that his hands were behind his back, not moving.

    When speaking Spanish, his hands were in front, constantly in motion.

  15. Reading: I Ching, Larklight ($3 YA book about steampunk space pirates. Still haven’t decided if it’s fun fluff or crap fluff).

    Planning: Meeting another possible training partner for silat this weekend. Chores.

    Wearing: Black cargos and a grey t.

    Writing: Nothing at the moment.

  16. Reading: I Ching, Larklight ($3 YA book about steampunk space pirates. Still haven’t decided if it’s fun fluff or crap fluff).

    Planning: Meeting another possible training partner for silat this weekend. Chores.

    Wearing: Black cargos and a grey t.

    Writing: Nothing at the moment.

  17. Reading: I Ching, Larklight ($3 YA book about steampunk space pirates. Still haven’t decided if it’s fun fluff or crap fluff).

    Planning: Meeting another possible training partner for silat this weekend. Chores.

    Wearing: Black cargos and a grey t.

    Writing: Nothing at the moment.

  18. Reading: I Ching, Larklight ($3 YA book about steampunk space pirates. Still haven’t decided if it’s fun fluff or crap fluff).

    Planning: Meeting another possible training partner for silat this weekend. Chores.

    Wearing: Black cargos and a grey t.

    Writing: Nothing at the moment.

  19. Reading: Just finished An Autumn War, the third book in Daneil Abraham’s Long Price quartet. It’s epic fantasy, as distinct from high fantasy, and I am a snob that way. That said, it is very good epic fantasy, with excellent payoff that’s been building like a tsunami for the last two books, and I see why Lou Anders was apprehensive about the fourth one in a where-do-you-go-from-here sense. He said that the fourth lived up to the other three, but I need a break first.

    Let us know how Desolation Road is. The only thing I’ve read by that author is River of Gods, sf set in India, of the sweeping epic variety, not to my taste, but quite good and quite important.

    Planning: Games club here tonight, hopefully without the head trauma this time. Probably just one or two people showing up. Visiting tomorrow and maybe running something for her and . Dresden files on Sunday, where the GM’s threatened / promised to do something about the 13 Fate points I seem to have stockpiled.

    Wearing: 1999 World Fantasy Convention t-shirt, jeans.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions #408.

      • Re: Epic v. High

        Broadly (with the usual caveats — this is my take on it and I am a snob):

        Epic Fantasy is Sweeping. It may be gritty, down in the muck and grime, or it may not, but it’s epic in scope. This tends to be a turn off for me in its purer forms because, at the end of the day, there’s no moral framework, no real ending, just “indeed do many things come to pass”. Of course, this is exactly what some people like about it, and that’s fine.

        High Fantasy has a framework. It also has the numinous. Here’s where I start getting into examples.

        High Fantasy can be Epic Fantasy. Lord of the Rings comes to mind, as does The Once and Future King. Both are epic in scope, but high in tone — both have a moral framework. And OaFK gives no easy answers. It is about a man who tried to make everyone live peaceful lives, and who failed at this endeavor.

        High Fantasy does not have to be Sweeping, though. Patricia McKillip may be one of the authors whose works embody what High Fantasy is. At one end, there’s the Riddlemaster trilogy, which is epic in scope, as is Forgotten Beasts of Eld, and possibly the two Cygnet books (currently combined in one). But, there are also more domestic tales, where the stakes are lower — not for the characters, but in terms of scope. In the Forests of Serre, Ombria in Shadow, Od Magic, and The Bell at Sealy Head all come to mind.

        If Epic Fantasy’s potential flaw is that all the sound and fury signifies nothing, High Fantasy’s potential flaw is that everything is too pat — it all happens for the best, or it all illustrates some moral point that the author is beating the audience with. It can also get too twee.

        One work of Epic Fantasy which I enjoyed while reading it was Guy Gavriel Kay’s The Lions of Al-Rassan. At the end, it’s full of “and these things happened” — but the characters are engaging, and that made all the difference in the world.

        Both Kay’s novel and the Long Price quartet (or, at any rate, the first three quarters of it) deny certainty.

        The Long Price quartet opens with an astonishing twist on some hoary old cliches. I loved this. And, I loved the moral choice that the character made.

        And, years later, he isn’t sure he was right any more. The certainty of youth fades. All well and good, and one of the strengths of the book. But, for the most part, I’m not interested in “Well, you pays your money, you takes your chances, you make your best guess, and it might as well be throwing darts at a wall.” The degree to which I like the Long Price quartet is the degree to which that isn’t what’s going on — the degree to which there is a underlying morality, and, to be fair, the degree to which I find the events in the book infuriating.

        But, I realized some years back, with some embarrassment, that I do prefer books with a moral framework. Oscar Wilde once claimed that the only flaw in The Picture of Dorian Gray is that it had a moral. I think that the moral is precisely what makes the book work. Oh, Wilde isn’t hammering the reader on the head saying, “Take note, Oh Reader! Here is the moral!” Heck, if anything, he’s going out of his way to hide the moral, and this, too, is a strength of this particular book.

        Um, is this answering the question? I can give more examples, including interesting border cases, but I’ve a tendency to babble.

      • Re: Epic v. High

        Broadly (with the usual caveats — this is my take on it and I am a snob):

        Epic Fantasy is Sweeping. It may be gritty, down in the muck and grime, or it may not, but it’s epic in scope. This tends to be a turn off for me in its purer forms because, at the end of the day, there’s no moral framework, no real ending, just “indeed do many things come to pass”. Of course, this is exactly what some people like about it, and that’s fine.

        High Fantasy has a framework. It also has the numinous. Here’s where I start getting into examples.

        High Fantasy can be Epic Fantasy. Lord of the Rings comes to mind, as does The Once and Future King. Both are epic in scope, but high in tone — both have a moral framework. And OaFK gives no easy answers. It is about a man who tried to make everyone live peaceful lives, and who failed at this endeavor.

        High Fantasy does not have to be Sweeping, though. Patricia McKillip may be one of the authors whose works embody what High Fantasy is. At one end, there’s the Riddlemaster trilogy, which is epic in scope, as is Forgotten Beasts of Eld, and possibly the two Cygnet books (currently combined in one). But, there are also more domestic tales, where the stakes are lower — not for the characters, but in terms of scope. In the Forests of Serre, Ombria in Shadow, Od Magic, and The Bell at Sealy Head all come to mind.

        If Epic Fantasy’s potential flaw is that all the sound and fury signifies nothing, High Fantasy’s potential flaw is that everything is too pat — it all happens for the best, or it all illustrates some moral point that the author is beating the audience with. It can also get too twee.

        One work of Epic Fantasy which I enjoyed while reading it was Guy Gavriel Kay’s The Lions of Al-Rassan. At the end, it’s full of “and these things happened” — but the characters are engaging, and that made all the difference in the world.

        Both Kay’s novel and the Long Price quartet (or, at any rate, the first three quarters of it) deny certainty.

        The Long Price quartet opens with an astonishing twist on some hoary old cliches. I loved this. And, I loved the moral choice that the character made.

        And, years later, he isn’t sure he was right any more. The certainty of youth fades. All well and good, and one of the strengths of the book. But, for the most part, I’m not interested in “Well, you pays your money, you takes your chances, you make your best guess, and it might as well be throwing darts at a wall.” The degree to which I like the Long Price quartet is the degree to which that isn’t what’s going on — the degree to which there is a underlying morality, and, to be fair, the degree to which I find the events in the book infuriating.

        But, I realized some years back, with some embarrassment, that I do prefer books with a moral framework. Oscar Wilde once claimed that the only flaw in The Picture of Dorian Gray is that it had a moral. I think that the moral is precisely what makes the book work. Oh, Wilde isn’t hammering the reader on the head saying, “Take note, Oh Reader! Here is the moral!” Heck, if anything, he’s going out of his way to hide the moral, and this, too, is a strength of this particular book.

        Um, is this answering the question? I can give more examples, including interesting border cases, but I’ve a tendency to babble.

  20. Reading: Just finished An Autumn War, the third book in Daneil Abraham’s Long Price quartet. It’s epic fantasy, as distinct from high fantasy, and I am a snob that way. That said, it is very good epic fantasy, with excellent payoff that’s been building like a tsunami for the last two books, and I see why Lou Anders was apprehensive about the fourth one in a where-do-you-go-from-here sense. He said that the fourth lived up to the other three, but I need a break first.

    Let us know how Desolation Road is. The only thing I’ve read by that author is River of Gods, sf set in India, of the sweeping epic variety, not to my taste, but quite good and quite important.

    Planning: Games club here tonight, hopefully without the head trauma this time. Probably just one or two people showing up. Visiting tomorrow and maybe running something for her and . Dresden files on Sunday, where the GM’s threatened / promised to do something about the 13 Fate points I seem to have stockpiled.

    Wearing: 1999 World Fantasy Convention t-shirt, jeans.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions #408.

  21. Reading: Just finished An Autumn War, the third book in Daneil Abraham’s Long Price quartet. It’s epic fantasy, as distinct from high fantasy, and I am a snob that way. That said, it is very good epic fantasy, with excellent payoff that’s been building like a tsunami for the last two books, and I see why Lou Anders was apprehensive about the fourth one in a where-do-you-go-from-here sense. He said that the fourth lived up to the other three, but I need a break first.

    Let us know how Desolation Road is. The only thing I’ve read by that author is River of Gods, sf set in India, of the sweeping epic variety, not to my taste, but quite good and quite important.

    Planning: Games club here tonight, hopefully without the head trauma this time. Probably just one or two people showing up. Visiting tomorrow and maybe running something for her and . Dresden files on Sunday, where the GM’s threatened / promised to do something about the 13 Fate points I seem to have stockpiled.

    Wearing: 1999 World Fantasy Convention t-shirt, jeans.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions #408.

  22. Reading: Just finished An Autumn War, the third book in Daneil Abraham’s Long Price quartet. It’s epic fantasy, as distinct from high fantasy, and I am a snob that way. That said, it is very good epic fantasy, with excellent payoff that’s been building like a tsunami for the last two books, and I see why Lou Anders was apprehensive about the fourth one in a where-do-you-go-from-here sense. He said that the fourth lived up to the other three, but I need a break first.

    Let us know how Desolation Road is. The only thing I’ve read by that author is River of Gods, sf set in India, of the sweeping epic variety, not to my taste, but quite good and quite important.

    Planning: Games club here tonight, hopefully without the head trauma this time. Probably just one or two people showing up. Visiting tomorrow and maybe running something for her and . Dresden files on Sunday, where the GM’s threatened / promised to do something about the 13 Fate points I seem to have stockpiled.

    Wearing: 1999 World Fantasy Convention t-shirt, jeans.

    Writing: My zine for Alarums and Excursions #408.

  23. Re: Epic v. High

    Broadly (with the usual caveats — this is my take on it and I am a snob):

    Epic Fantasy is Sweeping. It may be gritty, down in the muck and grime, or it may not, but it’s epic in scope. This tends to be a turn off for me in its purer forms because, at the end of the day, there’s no moral framework, no real ending, just “indeed do many things come to pass”. Of course, this is exactly what some people like about it, and that’s fine.

    High Fantasy has a framework. It also has the numinous. Here’s where I start getting into examples.

    High Fantasy can be Epic Fantasy. Lord of the Rings comes to mind, as does The Once and Future King. Both are epic in scope, but high in tone — both have a moral framework. And OaFK gives no easy answers. It is about a man who tried to make everyone live peaceful lives, and who failed at this endeavor.

    High Fantasy does not have to be Sweeping, though. Patricia McKillip may be one of the authors whose works embody what High Fantasy is. At one end, there’s the Riddlemaster trilogy, which is epic in scope, as is Forgotten Beasts of Eld, and possibly the two Cygnet books (currently combined in one). But, there are also more domestic tales, where the stakes are lower — not for the characters, but in terms of scope. In the Forests of Serre, Ombria in Shadow, Od Magic, and The Bell at Sealy Head all come to mind.

    If Epic Fantasy’s potential flaw is that all the sound and fury signifies nothing, High Fantasy’s potential flaw is that everything is too pat — it all happens for the best, or it all illustrates some moral point that the author is beating the audience with. It can also get too twee.

    One work of Epic Fantasy which I enjoyed while reading it was Guy Gavriel Kay’s The Lions of Al-Rassan. At the end, it’s full of “and these things happened” — but the characters are engaging, and that made all the difference in the world.

    Both Kay’s novel and the Long Price quartet (or, at any rate, the first three quarters of it) deny certainty.

    The Long Price quartet opens with an astonishing twist on some hoary old cliches. I loved this. And, I loved the moral choice that the character made.

    And, years later, he isn’t sure he was right any more. The certainty of youth fades. All well and good, and one of the strengths of the book. But, for the most part, I’m not interested in “Well, you pays your money, you takes your chances, you make your best guess, and it might as well be throwing darts at a wall.” The degree to which I like the Long Price quartet is the degree to which that isn’t what’s going on — the degree to which there is a underlying morality, and, to be fair, the degree to which I find the events in the book infuriating.

    But, I realized some years back, with some embarrassment, that I do prefer books with a moral framework. Oscar Wilde once claimed that the only flaw in The Picture of Dorian Gray is that it had a moral. I think that the moral is precisely what makes the book work. Oh, Wilde isn’t hammering the reader on the head saying, “Take note, Oh Reader! Here is the moral!” Heck, if anything, he’s going out of his way to hide the moral, and this, too, is a strength of this particular book.

    Um, is this answering the question? I can give more examples, including interesting border cases, but I’ve a tendency to babble.

  24. Re: Epic v. High

    Broadly (with the usual caveats — this is my take on it and I am a snob):

    Epic Fantasy is Sweeping. It may be gritty, down in the muck and grime, or it may not, but it’s epic in scope. This tends to be a turn off for me in its purer forms because, at the end of the day, there’s no moral framework, no real ending, just “indeed do many things come to pass”. Of course, this is exactly what some people like about it, and that’s fine.

    High Fantasy has a framework. It also has the numinous. Here’s where I start getting into examples.

    High Fantasy can be Epic Fantasy. Lord of the Rings comes to mind, as does The Once and Future King. Both are epic in scope, but high in tone — both have a moral framework. And OaFK gives no easy answers. It is about a man who tried to make everyone live peaceful lives, and who failed at this endeavor.

    High Fantasy does not have to be Sweeping, though. Patricia McKillip may be one of the authors whose works embody what High Fantasy is. At one end, there’s the Riddlemaster trilogy, which is epic in scope, as is Forgotten Beasts of Eld, and possibly the two Cygnet books (currently combined in one). But, there are also more domestic tales, where the stakes are lower — not for the characters, but in terms of scope. In the Forests of Serre, Ombria in Shadow, Od Magic, and The Bell at Sealy Head all come to mind.

    If Epic Fantasy’s potential flaw is that all the sound and fury signifies nothing, High Fantasy’s potential flaw is that everything is too pat — it all happens for the best, or it all illustrates some moral point that the author is beating the audience with. It can also get too twee.

    One work of Epic Fantasy which I enjoyed while reading it was Guy Gavriel Kay’s The Lions of Al-Rassan. At the end, it’s full of “and these things happened” — but the characters are engaging, and that made all the difference in the world.

    Both Kay’s novel and the Long Price quartet (or, at any rate, the first three quarters of it) deny certainty.

    The Long Price quartet opens with an astonishing twist on some hoary old cliches. I loved this. And, I loved the moral choice that the character made.

    And, years later, he isn’t sure he was right any more. The certainty of youth fades. All well and good, and one of the strengths of the book. But, for the most part, I’m not interested in “Well, you pays your money, you takes your chances, you make your best guess, and it might as well be throwing darts at a wall.” The degree to which I like the Long Price quartet is the degree to which that isn’t what’s going on — the degree to which there is a underlying morality, and, to be fair, the degree to which I find the events in the book infuriating.

    But, I realized some years back, with some embarrassment, that I do prefer books with a moral framework. Oscar Wilde once claimed that the only flaw in The Picture of Dorian Gray is that it had a moral. I think that the moral is precisely what makes the book work. Oh, Wilde isn’t hammering the reader on the head saying, “Take note, Oh Reader! Here is the moral!” Heck, if anything, he’s going out of his way to hide the moral, and this, too, is a strength of this particular book.

    Um, is this answering the question? I can give more examples, including interesting border cases, but I’ve a tendency to babble.

  25. R: Finished listening to Titus Alone, so now I have to read the unfinished fourth book and some essays and I’ll be done with my Mervyn Peake education. Almost done with this Brent Weeks Shadow of the Assassin. It’s so close to be really awesome, but the writing’s not quite up to par and the “destined child” thing is pissing me off. I’m also not sold on the late-arriving villain. Not sure what else to start with. Jorge Louis Borges is intimidating right now, so either some really, really good fantasy (maybe the Books of the New Sun?) or an ancient history.

    P: Mellow weekend of chilling. Starting to save for Fantasy Flight Games’ Warhammer RPG.

    W: Gray slacks, green t-shirt, plaid overshirt.

    W: Finishing up the Spider Civ rules for How to Host a Dungeon, using my video game design/programming sensibilities to streamline. It’s a lot easier to drop cool ideas for better executed ones now that I’ve been doing just that for a living.

  26. R: Finished listening to Titus Alone, so now I have to read the unfinished fourth book and some essays and I’ll be done with my Mervyn Peake education. Almost done with this Brent Weeks Shadow of the Assassin. It’s so close to be really awesome, but the writing’s not quite up to par and the “destined child” thing is pissing me off. I’m also not sold on the late-arriving villain. Not sure what else to start with. Jorge Louis Borges is intimidating right now, so either some really, really good fantasy (maybe the Books of the New Sun?) or an ancient history.

    P: Mellow weekend of chilling. Starting to save for Fantasy Flight Games’ Warhammer RPG.

    W: Gray slacks, green t-shirt, plaid overshirt.

    W: Finishing up the Spider Civ rules for How to Host a Dungeon, using my video game design/programming sensibilities to streamline. It’s a lot easier to drop cool ideas for better executed ones now that I’ve been doing just that for a living.

  27. R: Finished listening to Titus Alone, so now I have to read the unfinished fourth book and some essays and I’ll be done with my Mervyn Peake education. Almost done with this Brent Weeks Shadow of the Assassin. It’s so close to be really awesome, but the writing’s not quite up to par and the “destined child” thing is pissing me off. I’m also not sold on the late-arriving villain. Not sure what else to start with. Jorge Louis Borges is intimidating right now, so either some really, really good fantasy (maybe the Books of the New Sun?) or an ancient history.

    P: Mellow weekend of chilling. Starting to save for Fantasy Flight Games’ Warhammer RPG.

    W: Gray slacks, green t-shirt, plaid overshirt.

    W: Finishing up the Spider Civ rules for How to Host a Dungeon, using my video game design/programming sensibilities to streamline. It’s a lot easier to drop cool ideas for better executed ones now that I’ve been doing just that for a living.

  28. R: Finished listening to Titus Alone, so now I have to read the unfinished fourth book and some essays and I’ll be done with my Mervyn Peake education. Almost done with this Brent Weeks Shadow of the Assassin. It’s so close to be really awesome, but the writing’s not quite up to par and the “destined child” thing is pissing me off. I’m also not sold on the late-arriving villain. Not sure what else to start with. Jorge Louis Borges is intimidating right now, so either some really, really good fantasy (maybe the Books of the New Sun?) or an ancient history.

    P: Mellow weekend of chilling. Starting to save for Fantasy Flight Games’ Warhammer RPG.

    W: Gray slacks, green t-shirt, plaid overshirt.

    W: Finishing up the Spider Civ rules for How to Host a Dungeon, using my video game design/programming sensibilities to streamline. It’s a lot easier to drop cool ideas for better executed ones now that I’ve been doing just that for a living.

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