Sorcerer 2289: Technological Demons in the Science Fiction Solar System

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Forge Thread

The solar system at the end of the 22nd century is rapidly becoming colonized by nation-states, corporate entities and refugees from earth. Probes have been sent into the void beyond Pluto and Charon; data is transmitted from the deep black. Some settlers have even found remnants, evidence that something had touched down in this system before us. Something else is out there.

Humanity is not waiting for first contact to come to them. Technology continues to change what it means to be human and how humans relate, to one another and the worlds around them.

The Jovian Frontier is becoming the New World, the wild west, the great unknown of its era as science makes space travel more accessible to civilians. Just as they have done throughout history, human nations, corporations and religions push the desperate beyond the frontiers, towards the great unknown.

The nearby planets, moons and asteroids within the Terran Confederacy are the battlegrounds where earth-bound wars, espionage and politics continue from the solar paneled energy farms of Mercury to the city-states of Mars.

Human space travel is slow and tedious When one travels to another planet, it is akin to a European in the 16th century going to the New World. Even using gravity to sling-shot a ship at speeds thought impossible a century earlier, it is still a harrowing 5 month space journey from Earth to Pluto.

To most, technology is a tool, a means to an end. There are those who use technology to change what they are, who they are or even attempt to ascend beyond or descend below what it means to be a part of the human race. In this game, Sorcerers are beyond either of those people. They have access to a piece of transgressive technology that has no place in the human worlds. Maybe this is because it is from an alien culture, or perhaps they just wish to bend the worlds to their will by twisting that technology that every takes for granted until it is something else entirely.

These pieces of technology, bastardized un-science gone wrong are referred to as Demons. In this game, through the Sorcerers who bring them to life, they will change the entire solar system, for good or for ill.

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15 thoughts on “Sorcerer 2289: Technological Demons in the Science Fiction Solar System

  1. I don’t know if this is interesting, but…

    A friend of mine and I worked together in college to create a solar system scale setting that feels very similar. Ours was post (and pre-) apocalyptic sci-fi. Terra had finally blown herself up, leaving the surviving colonies on Luna, Venus, Mars, and scattered colonists in the asteroid belt to fend for themelves, alongside the “best and the brightest of Earth (America and Japan) who had sent themselves to some of Jupiter’s moons just as the bombs fell. We had decided on giant teleportation gates(Lee-Kleinman Rings, named after their shape and the scientists who invented them) floating in space that allowed transit between worlds. The corporations that owned the rings and the people who lived on them were a pretty major player in the game, too.

    In our setting, there was a cold war brewing; Venus had just suffered the collapse of its artificial ecology and everyone was eying Mars, the oldest and best closest to self sufficient of the colonies, as the system’s new breadbasket, but the Martians were insisting that their farms weren’t ready to feed everyone yet. The characters were going to be giant robot pilots, experiencing all the drama of your typical mech anime alongside the vicissitudes of economic (and occasionally physical) warfare.

  2. I don’t know if this is interesting, but…

    A friend of mine and I worked together in college to create a solar system scale setting that feels very similar. Ours was post (and pre-) apocalyptic sci-fi. Terra had finally blown herself up, leaving the surviving colonies on Luna, Venus, Mars, and scattered colonists in the asteroid belt to fend for themelves, alongside the “best and the brightest of Earth (America and Japan) who had sent themselves to some of Jupiter’s moons just as the bombs fell. We had decided on giant teleportation gates(Lee-Kleinman Rings, named after their shape and the scientists who invented them) floating in space that allowed transit between worlds. The corporations that owned the rings and the people who lived on them were a pretty major player in the game, too.

    In our setting, there was a cold war brewing; Venus had just suffered the collapse of its artificial ecology and everyone was eying Mars, the oldest and best closest to self sufficient of the colonies, as the system’s new breadbasket, but the Martians were insisting that their farms weren’t ready to feed everyone yet. The characters were going to be giant robot pilots, experiencing all the drama of your typical mech anime alongside the vicissitudes of economic (and occasionally physical) warfare.

  3. I don’t know if this is interesting, but…

    A friend of mine and I worked together in college to create a solar system scale setting that feels very similar. Ours was post (and pre-) apocalyptic sci-fi. Terra had finally blown herself up, leaving the surviving colonies on Luna, Venus, Mars, and scattered colonists in the asteroid belt to fend for themelves, alongside the “best and the brightest of Earth (America and Japan) who had sent themselves to some of Jupiter’s moons just as the bombs fell. We had decided on giant teleportation gates(Lee-Kleinman Rings, named after their shape and the scientists who invented them) floating in space that allowed transit between worlds. The corporations that owned the rings and the people who lived on them were a pretty major player in the game, too.

    In our setting, there was a cold war brewing; Venus had just suffered the collapse of its artificial ecology and everyone was eying Mars, the oldest and best closest to self sufficient of the colonies, as the system’s new breadbasket, but the Martians were insisting that their farms weren’t ready to feed everyone yet. The characters were going to be giant robot pilots, experiencing all the drama of your typical mech anime alongside the vicissitudes of economic (and occasionally physical) warfare.

  4. I should add that I’m aware that the substance is kin, but the style was very different. Our setting was less posthuman technology-dominated sci-fi, more economically and politically complicated military sci-fi. Still, the two settings could be cousins.

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